July & August 2017

It is August. Italy still more or less shuts down and so do I.

A high point is a visit from Australian journalist/photographer Glynis Macri who took a day out of her vacation in Italy to swing by Verona to see me. We have been friends for a very long time and share many a war story.

The horribly hot weather broke twice.  The first time I was so excited that I pulled out a bottle of Bucci Pongelli. I love this red wine. It has everything I crave, juicy fruit wrapped in supple elegance. Yum.  The second time, I opened a bottle of Donnafugata’s Tancredi. “That’s serious wine,” said Michael. Indeed, it is, and it also rich and intriguing.

For the rest of the month I sat by the open French doors reading and writing and hoping for a little breeze to come my way.

JULLY JULY JULY

30 July Casina Alba Terra

The Cascina Alba Terra project grew out of a meeting between the Coffele wine estate in Soave and the Association on the Orme Onlus. The goal is to rediscover traditional methods of raising animals and crops, with an emphasis on organic techniques. Visit their website: http://www.cascinaalbaterra.it/

After visiting the Coffele estate, sipping some wine and inhaling the fragrant breeze, Susan H., Michael and I head to Il Drago in Soave for dinner.  And a good time was had by all.  Thank you, Susan.

July 23-27 The 23rd San Gio Verona Video Festival

We are in the midst of the annual San Gio video festival: This is organized every year by our pal Ugo, assisted by Michael.

I spoke to a fellow who photographed the Beatles in Tahiti in 1964.(Piero Oliosi)
He said: “I was there to photograph Marlon Brando on his Island. I got to talking to a local guy who said: ‘You know I ‘ve rented my boat to an English band. The Bootles. The Battles. Something like that.’ I immediately rented a boat and went out there, told them who I was and
they invited me on board.”

I asked him how old he was at that time because he must have been a boy. He told me he was 32, to which I replied ‘No Way!’
He said: If you do something you enjoy, something that makes you happy, you never get old.”

He later photographed Michael and me and said he was going to send the photos to his New York agency. I said to Michael: “Gee, just think we may find a photo of ourselves in an adult diaper ad some day. Yikes!”

I talked to a guy from Germany who, when he was young and needed money, wrote the captions for porno films.

“I never saw the films,” he added hastily. “They only sent me the scripts.”

I asked him if there were plots or just – Yes. Yes! Yes!! and Now. Now! Now!! and Harder. Harder! Harder!!

He said there were plots. I said: “Like. Hi, we are carpenters. Do you want to see our tools?”

He conceded that yes, that was pretty much it.

Many years ago when I was living in New York…I needed to make a little extra money. A friend of mine (doing creative writing at Columbia) confessed that he wrote “letters to the editor” for Pent House Magazine. He said: “I’ll arrange an interview with the editor for you and go with you…but you have to tell him that what you are going to write is true. Everybody knows that this is not the case but we all have to pretend.” So, I got the interview and did my pitch: phone sex. I wrote what I thought was incredibly naughty stuff. A few weeks later I got a rejection letter from the very nice editor who said that my submission was “too romantic”. Man, I wish i had saved that rejection letter.

An Iranian documentary filmmaker told me she wanted to invite me to Iran to do a documentary, featuring me tasting Persian food (traditional and contemporary). I said okay, secure in the fact there was no way I would be issued a visa to go to Tehran. I like the idea of tasting Persian food…but geeze I no longer like the discomfort of long-distance travel. Also the distance between an idea for a film and the production of an actual film is a long, long one…and often the original idea gets lost along the way.

So things are turning over here in Verona.

Ugo arranges for winery visits in the morning (with the festival taking place in the late afternoon and evening.

We visited. Le Mandolare (www.cantinalemandolare.com), owned by the Rodighiero family. A lovely visit, charming company. At the tasting the winery’s entry-level Soave wine, went down a treat: fresh, with a burst of apricot on the middle palate that carries on through the finish. It was just what was needed on a hot day.

I asked Chiara Rodighiero what she would have done had she not entered the family business. “Music,” she said. “I play the Sax and the French Horn. My husband went to the conservatory and studied French Horn.” She still plays in a band under the direction of Carlo Montanari.

COFFELE. (www.coffele.it) Wow! What a visit! The Coffele family pulled out all the stops, giving the San Gio crowd an exceptional experience. We visited their animals – donkeys, goats, chickens and a really fine work horse -, we lolled on the lovely lawn overlooking the most splendid view of Soave, and then they provided us with a bang-up lunch. (The chef was the winner of Hell’s Kitchen Italia). AND the wines were – of course- great as always. Among them there was the elegant, pear-tinged 2015 Soave Brut and the Ca Visco Soave, with its enticing undertow of ripe pears on the palate.

We also visited another producer, who has a very beautiful facility but has not yet come to grips with what it means to do a winery visit.

PRODUCER TIP: If it is a broiling hot summer day, with the sun directly over-head (as it is around High Noon), then it would probably be best to NOT deliver the lengthy opening remarks in a shade-less, chair-less portion of the terrace. In the same vein, it would NOT be wise to take a group of people who can still feel rivulets of sweat sliding down their spines into a chilled cellar room (ice cream would not have melted or even softened in this environment) to stand for over 30 minutes. In short: visitors are human beings and should be treated with the courtesy you would show to any mammal.

6 July Maddalena Crippa at the Teatro Romano

I like the trend of allowing women to play Shakespearean kings and princes.  A few years ago, the great British actress Fiona Shaw played the role of Richard II and of course last Glenda Jackson appeared as King Lear.

We arrive at the Teatro Romano, built in the late 1st century BC, to see Richard II, the title role performed by Maddelena Crippa.

For those that need reminding, here is a brief description of Richard II, from 1066 And All That: A Memorable History of England, comprising all the parts you can remember, including 103 Good Things, 5 Bad Kings and 2 Genuine Dates  (yes, I get most of my British history form this wee bookie.)

Richard II: An unbalanced King

Richard II was only a boy at his accession: one day, however, suspecting that he was now twenty-one, he asked his uncle and, on learning that he was, mounted the throne himself and tried first being a Good King and then being a Bad King, without enjoying either very much: then, being told that he was unbalanced, he got off the throne again in despair, exclaiming gloomily: “For God’s sake, let me sit on the ground and tell bad stories about cabbages and things.” Whereupon his cousin Lancaster (spelt Bolingbroke) quickly mounted the throne and said he was Henry IV Part I. Richard was thus abdicated d was led to the Tower and subsequently to Pontefract Castle where he died of mysterious circumstances, probably a surfeit of Pumfreys (spelt Pontefracts).