January 2018

First things first, Books. The War Service of Sherlock Holmes, published by The Baker Street Irregulars. I have a chapter on Tokay in the book. Here is a link where people can purchase it, if they so desire.

http://www.bakerstreetjournal.com/trenches.html

January 6th is the designated birthday of Mr. Sherlock Holmes.  Every year there are celebrations in New York City and in London. I have been to these dinners many times. This year, I just could not face the weather in New York.  I do not own snow boots or a decent winter coat.  Nor do I own anything made with “camping in the Arctic” padded insulation.  I regret not being able to attend as I miss the camaraderie.

The only organizations I have ever willingly joined are the Adventuresses of Sherlock Holmes (ASH) and the Baker Street Irregulars (BSI).

Here is a photo taken a few decades ago: from left to right: top row: Mickey Fromkin, Susan Dahlinger, Evelyn Herzog, me. bottom row:  Roberta Pearson, Susan Rice, Sara Montegue, M.E. Rich.

The following is an edited excerpt from my contribution to “Sherlock Holmes Fandom, Sherlockiana, and the Great Game,” edited by Betsy Rosenblatt and Roberta Pearson, Transformative Works and Cultures, no. 23. http://dx.doi.org/10.3983/twc.2017.0888.

When I moved to New York City in late 1977 to manage The Mysterious Bookshop—a job I was offered because I have always been a voracious reader of mystery novels—I was fortunate enough to immediately fall in with the Adventuresses, and I began attending their monthly get-togethers (ASH Wednesdays) in 1978.

What a magnificent group we were! I look back on those days fondly. We Adventuresses loved books, we loved to laugh, we knew how to have a good (and occasionally riotous) time. We were free to be who we really were—women with agile minds and a knack for mischief. Perhaps even more than an appreciation of the Holmes stories themselves, it was the camaraderie and the feeling of having found a home that drew me to ASH.

I was staying at the apartment of Mickey Fromkin and Susan Rice, two fabulous ASH, on the eve of my first trip to France in 1982. It was to be one of my free-wheeling rambles around Europe in search of some as yet undefined je ne sais quoi. That year, serendipity led me to picking grapes in Champagne and living for a time in Paris, and this in turn led me to my entry into the wine trade.

That late summer evening in Mickey and Susan’s book-filled front room, Evelyn Herzog, ASH’s Principal Unprincipled Adventuress and founding-mother of the organization, told me that I could not set out to live the life of an Adventuress without becoming one officially. She invited me to join ASH and gave me the investiture name of Mlle. Vernet, the name of Sherlock Holmes’ maternal grand-mère. It is a name with which I am very proud to be associated. The fading yellowed certificate that commemorates this event hangs in my office as I type this.

In 2006, in a hotel room at the Algonquin on a sunny morning after the Big January Dinner, I called a little meeting of some of my favorite ASH and proposed a idea, one conceived because I was lonely for Sherlockian companionship. I asked them and some clever Boys to write essays for a book called Ladies, Ladies: The Women in the Life of Sherlock Holmes. I did this not so much to amplify the place of women in the Holmes stories (although it does this handily), but rather to have a reason to be in weekly contact with some of my closest friends. The book is lovely. It is chock-full of information. But for me, it is a document attesting to long-time friendship.

In 2010, thanks to the lobbying of Venerable Ash and Old Boys from my New York youth, I was invited to join the Baker Street Irregulars, with the investiture of Imperial Tokay. This is a reference to a fine wine with startling medicinal properties, which is mentioned in The Sign of Four and His Last Bow. The investiture name is, of course, a reference to my career in the wine trade. I am grateful for this honor: the BSI parchment shares wall space with my ASH certificate.

I went back to New York for the first time after many years in Europe in the mid-2000s to attend a BSI dinner, I was assailed by a covey of young women. One of them looked at me reverently, her eyes wide with wonder, and said: “You’re one of the old ASH.” Over the rest of the weekend, I found myself saddled with that label. It was disconcerting, because I knew that—in her heart, mind, and soul—an ASH never grows old.

First things first: Books

Every summer from the age of eight until I left for University followed the same pattern: I would soon be burnt to a red and painful crispiness by the Kansas sun and spend the rest of the summer in the shade with a tall glass of iced tea and a stack of detective novels. I would read through them one after another. When the stack was finished I would walk to the library to check out another stack or ride my bike around to garage sales, picking up Perry Masons for my Grandmother and assorted 5-cent books for myself.  Now – several decades later – to be paid to read books seems like a dream come true. Readers will understand the incredible pleasure there is to be had in saying as you stretch out on the divan with a book (or one hidden in a computer): “I’m working”.

New Years Eve with Chievo Fans

We have avoided gong out on New Years Eve for many years because of the fireworks that often accompany this event; Stanley, quite sensibly is afraid of the noise. The nice people at the Chievo fan club said: Bring him along.

There was another dog there and both Lucio (a big black something or other) and Stanley (a medium brown something or other) were very well behaved as were the assortment of children, who also attended. This is an artistic photo taken by Michael, with our pal Greta’s profile and Giovanni rattling the pots and pans.

December 26 Boxing Day Tea

Every year on we go to Ugo and Stefania’s for English Tea. Michael is the official Tea Master (because he is English), the ladies all wear hats, and we eat cucumber sandwiches.  Tea drifts into aperitif time and that leads on to dinner.

 

The Twins (Francesco and Giovanni) were home from their university experiences (F.’s in Singapore), G’s in Lisbon) and wanted to learn about wine tasting. We opened one of the wines that we had brought: a Coteaux du Layon 1996. It was stunning. This kind of wine is the reason that people become wine tasters: it is the thrilling combination of sensual and intellectual pleasure. Long, evolving, complex swirl of rich flavors all buoyed by sprightly, dancing acidity. Needless to say, the boys had never tasted anything like it and were entranced by its balance and enticing shifting pattern of flavors (ideas of quince, apricot, mandarin orange. A great way to bid goodbye to 2017

December 24/25 Annual Christmas party at Ugo’s

December 22 Big Cake

Michael donated a Big Cake to the Chievo fan Club dinner.  It provided many photo opportunities.

 

December 15 Donnafugata and the rest….

I opened a bottle of Donnafugta 2016 La Fuga Sicilia Chardonnay – bright, refreshing lively satisfying on the nose and palate, flavorful fruity finish, infused with sprightly notes of exotic fruits and greengage plums. I started thinking of the future – say 20 or so years from now – when I will (perhaps) be sitting in the old folk’s home.  I hope to heaven that wherever I am there are Donnafugata* wines on the menu. I told Michael this and he rolled his eyes and said: Magari (which can be loosely translated as: “Yeah, in your dreams!” ) And I guess he is right…. these are the satisfying (easy to drink yet intellectually interesting) wines that dance through my dreams.

 

And  Zanovello, Bucci, Drei Dona, Fattoria Zerbina. Gini and Podere San Cristoforo would be most welcome on that fictional winelist

December 13

Michael and I took a brief train ride to a small town and were picked up by Michael’s pal Lorenzo, who whisked us to her family’s offices to look at the new brochure and attendant material. For several hours Michael and I argued over word choice until we were pretty sure that the booklet would be a colossal success.  I love words and so does Michael, perhaps this is why we have remained happy together for all these years.

December 8 Children’s theatre

As I often do after seeing an old movie I often look up the cast members to see how their lives evolved over the years.  I looked up David Wood, who played Johnny in If… and read that he has become a leading light in children’s theatre in Britain, has written plays that have been performed around the world and that he wrote a book, which is aptly titled Theatre for Children: A guide to Writing, Adapting, Directing and Acting. I leaped from my chair and began scanning the bookshelves.  Yes, I have that book.  Here is why.

Twice our pal Ugo has pulled me into his orbit with the promise of securing a financial backer for a musical. The first time, we met at the Amnesia Café where he introduced me to a money-dispensing politician from Vicenza, a town an hour away from Verona by train. Over cool glasses of sparkling wine it was decided that I would write a children’s musical depicting the life of Jules Verne and that the Vicenza town council would foot the bill for the production. I was to have a cast of thirty children and adults that would include jugglers, acrobats and ballet dancers!  I was in heaven. Susan in Colorado and Rita in Kansas started sending me books on and by Jules Verne. I wrote six songs and studied stagecraft books in an attempt to figure out how to make fifty small “hot-air” balloons descend from the rafters of the theatre and how to make a volcano erupt on stage. Time passed and whenever I asked Ugo about the funding he was evasive. Jules Verne’s centennial came and went, and with it the dream of producing the show. Funding for it had wandered away while the politico was having drinks with someone else one late afternoon.

The second time Ugo encouraged Michael and me to write an original musical set in Verona. The only catch was that we needed to use his accordion playing pal Eugenio as the composer/arranger. While Michael and I were thinking of boffo end-of-act-one show-stoppers, Eugenio was thinking about a nice little thirty-minute chamber piece for accordion and guitar performed in Veronese dialect. Never has the phrase “artistic differences” had such resonance.

December 7  IF…

Michael and I took the bus to an outlying neighborhood of Verona to a small cinema to see If…  Neither of us had seen the film in a few decades. It was directed by Lindsay Anderson and came out in 1968.  Both Michael and I were too young in that period to see it then – it had an X rating after all.  It marked the first film role for Malcolm McDowell, and it was this film that led Stanley Kubrick to cast him in Clockwork Orange. If… won the Palme d’Or a Cannes and, as Wikipedia tells us “In 2017 a poll of 150 actors, directors, writers, producers and critics for Time Out magazine ranked it the 9th best British film ever.”  It was wonderful to see it again.

December 6 Marco Felluga and Mushroom Pie

I wanted something to go with my star anise-infused mushroom pie, so I opened a bottle of Marco Felluga Bianco.

Note: Fiercely bright, with a fine concentration of yellow color. On the nose, creamy, with a lemony note rising and lifting the broad fruit and vanilla notes of wood. On the palate, very round, with the flavors echoing the sensations on the nose Very satisfying…

 

First Things First – Books

I read Women & Power: A Manifesto by Mary Beard.

My favorite quotes: (referring to Homer’s The Odyssey): “the first recorded example of a man telling a woman to ‘shut up’, telling her that her voice was not to be heard in public” and “if women are not perceived to be fully within the structures of power, surely it is power that we need to redefine rather than women?”

This slim volume could not have appeared at a more appropriate time.

November 21

I visited the Gini Winery. http://www.ginivini.com/

I have followed the development of this winery for more than two decades. Sandro and Claudio’s dedication to making quality wines has never wavered. It is always a pleasure to taste – and drink – their wines.

Among the wines I tasted:

2016 Soave Classico. Fresh, full, fragrant, flora. Enticing scent of blossoms. Lemon sherbet over ripe pear flavor.

2014 Froscá Soave Classico – fresh vibrant alive. An almost mandarin touch to the acidity. Slides down easy.  The grapes are from vines that are between 80 and 90 years old.

2014 Salvarenza (“Vecchie Vigne” – old vines. The vineyards are over 100 years old) A fragrance that draws me in. exotic fruits emerge. Elegant. Well-knit The finish evolves, with new flavors emerging, others receding.

2001 Salvarenza – Clean. Tightly-knit flavor- After 15 minutes in the glass still firm and fresh.

“With our wines. the minerality comes out over time, after 5 or 6 years,” says Claudio.

2013 Campo alle More Pinot Noir – Bright. Vibrant. Alive. On the nose an amalgam of red berry fruit (raspberries, blueberries). On the palate the wine blossoms – all the scents detected on the nose unfurl. An undertow of bruised plum. Long flavorful finish

On to Zymé in Valpolicella. The winery is a work of art. Anyone interested in winery architecture should visit.

November 15

I was at the Colli Euganei winery of Paolo Brunello. We tasted 2 wines blind, with a group of 14 local wine producers.

The first was a Garganega/Tocai blend called Il Bondo. The wine is named for Paolo’s much-loved dog.  It (the wine) was fresh and appealing.

He then opens a red wine. From the first sniff the wine had captured me.  It was one of those Eureka! moments that every professional wine tasters knows: that instantaneous recognition of quality and style. The moment when you realize that you are not just tasting a beverage but rather you are tasting a Real Wine.

I waxed eloquent on the wine, my enthusiasm growing.

Paolo pulled the sleeve from the bottle to reveal that the wine was….Not His.

The winemaker was Franco Zanovello.  Readers of this diary know that I adore Zanovello’s wines.  I often refer to them as Audrey Hepburn wines – elegant yet lush and complex with staying power and longevity. This wine was no exception.

Here is my note:

2009 Natio Ca’Lustra-Zanovello (Merlot, Carménère and Cabernet Sauvignon)  – bruised plum color with a ruby sheen. Clean, fresh, with a thrilling undertow of mature fruit (blackberry, brambles, blackcurrants, hint of herbaceousness. Lingering, fruit-filled, ever-evolving finish.  Very satisfying.

Franco’s daughter was at the tasting.  I said to her: “You probably don’t realize this because he is your father but…Franco has a rare talent.”

November 8

I opened a bottle of 1981 (yes, 1981) Masi Amarone. The wine’s lively acidity and rich fruit flavors were wrapped in the incense-like fragrances I always associate with mature Amarones.  It was a lovely tasting experience.

It is safe to say that they don’t make wines like this anymore.

I also tasted a Chateaux Mongravey, Margaux 2011. Fresh, bright, elegant fruit and a long flavorful finish. It deserved all the awards it received.

October 2017

 

First things first: Books

I have shelves of autographed mysteries from my days at The Mysterious Bookshop in New York, as well as a nice letter and autographed copy of Robert Mazzocco’s first poetry book.

I had written him a letter after reading one of his poems in the New Yorker.  The poem is called All Night.  I mentioned in my letter that the layout of the lines echoed the rhythm of the text. He wrote back saying that the poem would never again appear in that form because the editor of his first book tucked the lines in order to accommodate the book’s format, and he invited me to come to a signing. I arrived to find his signing table surrounded by poetry lovers. I caught his eyes and mouthed the words: “I wrote the letter.”  He stopped what he was doing, walked around the table,  took my hands in his and said: “You’re the one! No one ever sends fan letters to poets!”

One of my happiest author memories.

28 October Marco Felluga’s 90th Birthday Party   

I arrive in Friuli for the celebration of Marco Felluga’s 90th Birthday.

I need not have worried about my dress (bought in 2000) and Chinese inspired jacket (bought in 2003 at a model’s consignment shop in London.  This is a shop where fashion models – who get to keep the clothes they wear in photo shoots – dump their booty.   The only thing in the shop that fit were shoes and this jacket.) In fact, I received several compliments on the ensemble.

With the repeated mention of “black tie” on the invitation and in phone conversations with the organizers, I had begun to dwell on what “black tie” means for women at Tuscan galas – brilliant hand-embroidered satin dresses, the twinkle of real diamonds, etc. Whew. Friuli finery is within the reach of normal human beings.

I sat next to Mr. Felluga’s Austrian importer who said that Marco was still mentally and physically agile and as focused and dynamic as ever.

Mr. Felluga was asked what his plans for the future were and he replied without a moments hesitation that he wanted to inicreased the acceptance of Pinot Bianco as a top-quality, classic grape variety.

With his energy and drive I believe that he could achieve anything he put his mind to.

20 October Pumpkin and sausage lasagna & Susan and gossip

Susan H. comes over for dinner.  The nattering goes down smoothly with glasses of Ferrari’s Giulio Ferrari 2000, followed by a 2013 Ribera del Duero “Crianza” from Virtus.  I had opened this Spanish wine the day before and tasted it: rich, round, red – juicy but with backbone.  A very satisfying wine. It goes down a treat with the lasagna.  Here is a photo of Susan with a snuggling Stanley. For starters we taste Redoro’s artichokes under oil and the company’s tuna under oil.  They are a revelation.  I have never in my life tasted anything held under olive oil that did not taste of…well…oil. However, this time out the flavors of the vegetable and the tuna were bright and pure.  I did not expect this freshness. I am not usually one to gush, but…if you have a chance to try these products from Redoro, do so.

18 October Fog Hell

I am in the Colli Euganei. Lisa C. drives me to the teeny, tiny deserted-after-nine-p.m. train station so I can catch my train for Verona. In the car creeping along the country road, we are surrounded by a moist gray undulating wall of fog.  At first, I think: gee, this I like being in some existentialist film.  After 30 minutes, I realized that this is, in fact, my version of Hell – endless fog – no sense of actually moving forward – no hope of actually arriving anywhere.

 

14 October – Off to Redoro in Mezzane di Sotto

We visited the Redoro Olive Oil Mill (owned by the Salvagno family) in Mezzane di Sotto. The mill is the oldest in the Veneto that is still producing oil. I said to Michael: “Daniele Salvagno has such merry eyes he could play young Santa when they do the biopic.” “He’s not that young,” says Michael. I then explain to him that since Santa is well over a thousand years old, then Daniele – with his twinkling eyes, rosy cheeks, lush dark curls, boundless energy and jovial demeanor – is still in the running for the role. Michael bows to my fantasy logic. Here is a photo of Daniele.  You may decide for yourself if the casting works.

12 October Samples arrive from SPAIN!

The UPS man delivered samples and pronounced my name correctly!

They are from the Virtus winery.  I tried the Vega del Yuso Ribera del Duoro. Here is my note: 100% Tempranillo. Deep rich ruby. Full and forthcoming on the nose, scents of blackberries, brambles and a bright, lifting idea of gooseberries. Round and easy on the palate.  After I tasted, I drank a glass with my lunch – pizza with mushrooms.  It went down a treat.  The following day, I had a glass with spaghetti Bolognese.  It also went well with a bit of Parmesan and an episode of Love it or List It – Vancouver edition.  Yes, I am a sucker for Canadian buy-a-house-shows.

Sunday 8 Majorotti

We went to a street fair organized by the Majorotti (loosely translates as Big Men Majorettes), an association that raises money for charity, and whose members wear shiny, red, swishy skirts and wigs in an assortment of colors – from Carnival yellow and blue to (could pass for real) brown. There is something freeding and empowering about stridinig out in a short, flippy skirt, as these men have come to appreciate.

October 2 My book on the Colli Euganei wins a literary award!

And a very nice award it was too: a silver medallion, with a little certificate stating its weight and the grade of silver used.  Wow!  All this, and there was a concert performed by three excellent guitarists that followed the presentation.  And that was followed by a dinner in a villa/restaurant, where I spoke with a nice young man who is studying to be a forest ranger. I recommended he read The Hidden Life of Trees. You will never look at a tree in the same way after reading this fascinating book. The award was issued by the Monselice Historical Museum.

I have won big deal international awards for books and only got a letter informing me that I had won, while the publisher got a certificate. Believe me, a medal, music and a nice dinner (which included my fan club – Michael, Franco and Anna) was soooo much more appreciated!

 

September 2017

September 2017

30 September The 36th edition of the Masi Prize

We headed upstairs at the Teatro Filarmonico di Verona and were escorted to a private box overlooking the stage.  I love these boxes: they offer leg room, and a brilliant view point for observing the audience as well as the stage. This years winner of the International Prize went to Rwandan author Yolanda Mukagasana.

27 September Off to the Carroarmato

Visitors from the U.K.. A good time was had by all. When you come to Verona you must visit the Osteria Carroarmato. Dogs and children are welcome…as is every sort of grownup.

September 8 In Venice for the day

We (Michael, Stanley and I) arrive in Venice for lunch with Michelle Lovric. She writes novels and poetry – and just wrote/ghosted a best seller about Milly Dowler -My Sister Milly.  She said it was a shattering two years: talking to the family and interviewing police, etc.  She has a very elegant writing style, it would be interesting to read the book.

Then off we go to the Lido for our pal Ugo’s prize giving ceremony.  Each year Ugo organizes an alternative (to the official Venice Film Festival) award fest called the Golden Eel (as opposed to the Golden Lion). Stanley loved the day. He got ham at Michelle’s and eel skin at Ugo’s do.  Who could ask for more?  Here is a photo of Stanley making friends on the Lido.

Here is a link to a poem by Michelle (a work in progress).

http://the-history-girls.blogspot.it/2017/09/beaver-country-michelle-lovric.

And while we are talking about poetry, here is a link to a youtube of poet Glenn Shea reading “A Luddite Relents,” from the second book.

https://youtu.be/1uvpH5PRV3A

7 September – Off to the Mantova

We are here to listen to the delicious announcement of a new wine from Lake Garda: Spumante Garda DOC. The wine is fresh, fruity and lively and it is hoped it will  offer consumers an alternative to the ubiquitous Prosecco. It is sure to find its niche: the wine is crisp and good, the volumes are significant and the prices seem reasonable.

The announcement was followed by a bang-up lunch at Mantova’s historic il Cigno restaurant. Top notch service, good food and delightful company. The Garda sparkling wine flowed freely!

The organizers had cleverly planned the event to coincide with the Mantua Book Fair and had procured tickets for some of the events for the assembled journalists.

We were treated to a very witty and amusing panel discussion (titled “Ironici malinconici” ) featuring Marco Malvaldi (who writes a mystery series that is translated in to English and published by Penguin) and Diego De Silva (who writes comic novels, which are also translated into English and published by various companies.) At one point the moderator asked for questions from the audience and a woman rose and grabbed the mic.  She started in on a long rambling introduction that included the words: “I too am an author…”  The collective groan from the 400 members of the audience was invigorating.

September 1 – 2 Off to Campania

I fly off to the heart of Aglianico del Taburno-land in Campania to be was part of a panel discussing Aglianico.

Wine Lesson: The Aglianico grape variety has been called “The Barolo of the South”. Certainly, its versatility makes it one of the most important Southern red grapes in terms of wine production. It lends body and character to lively rosés; to fruity quaffing wines and to well-structured and velvety textured, long-lived reds. It is cultivated primarily in Campania, Basilicata, Puglia and Molise. Aglianico del Taburno is a DOCG wine whose production zone is located in the Province of Benevento.

It seems that the producers here are trying to solidify their wine’s identity and expand its visibility on the world stage. During my whirlwind visit to the zone I taste wines from two producers and was impressed by them both.

I will be tasting some samples next month and will write about the wines at that time.

What I am writing at the moment is a Holiday Season (December) article on Champagne cocktails for a Singapore magazine. The topic was my choice. The editor just said “Festive tipples”, and I was fed up with writing the “affordable alternatives to Champagne” article.  For those interested: Kir Royale was sipped by Katherine Hepburn in Philadelphia Story and a round of French 75s was ordered in Rick’s Bar in that Bogart classic Casablanca.

 

 

July & August 2017

It is August. Italy still more or less shuts down and so do I.

A high point is a visit from Australian journalist/photographer Glynis Macri who took a day out of her vacation in Italy to swing by Verona to see me. We have been friends for a very long time and share many a war story.

The horribly hot weather broke twice.  The first time I was so excited that I pulled out a bottle of Bucci Pongelli. I love this red wine. It has everything I crave, juicy fruit wrapped in supple elegance. Yum.  The second time, I opened a bottle of Donnafugata’s Tancredi. “That’s serious wine,” said Michael. Indeed, it is, and it also rich and intriguing.

For the rest of the month I sat by the open French doors reading and writing and hoping for a little breeze to come my way.

JULLY JULY JULY

30 July Casina Alba Terra

The Cascina Alba Terra project grew out of a meeting between the Coffele wine estate in Soave and the Association on the Orme Onlus. The goal is to rediscover traditional methods of raising animals and crops, with an emphasis on organic techniques. Visit their website: http://www.cascinaalbaterra.it/

After visiting the Coffele estate, sipping some wine and inhaling the fragrant breeze, Susan H., Michael and I head to Il Drago in Soave for dinner.  And a good time was had by all.  Thank you, Susan.

July 23-27 The 23rd San Gio Verona Video Festival

We are in the midst of the annual San Gio video festival: This is organized every year by our pal Ugo, assisted by Michael.

I spoke to a fellow who photographed the Beatles in Tahiti in 1964.(Piero Oliosi)
He said: “I was there to photograph Marlon Brando on his Island. I got to talking to a local guy who said: ‘You know I ‘ve rented my boat to an English band. The Bootles. The Battles. Something like that.’ I immediately rented a boat and went out there, told them who I was and
they invited me on board.”

I asked him how old he was at that time because he must have been a boy. He told me he was 32, to which I replied ‘No Way!’
He said: If you do something you enjoy, something that makes you happy, you never get old.”

He later photographed Michael and me and said he was going to send the photos to his New York agency. I said to Michael: “Gee, just think we may find a photo of ourselves in an adult diaper ad some day. Yikes!”

I talked to a guy from Germany who, when he was young and needed money, wrote the captions for porno films.

“I never saw the films,” he added hastily. “They only sent me the scripts.”

I asked him if there were plots or just – Yes. Yes! Yes!! and Now. Now! Now!! and Harder. Harder! Harder!!

He said there were plots. I said: “Like. Hi, we are carpenters. Do you want to see our tools?”

He conceded that yes, that was pretty much it.

Many years ago when I was living in New York…I needed to make a little extra money. A friend of mine (doing creative writing at Columbia) confessed that he wrote “letters to the editor” for Pent House Magazine. He said: “I’ll arrange an interview with the editor for you and go with you…but you have to tell him that what you are going to write is true. Everybody knows that this is not the case but we all have to pretend.” So, I got the interview and did my pitch: phone sex. I wrote what I thought was incredibly naughty stuff. A few weeks later I got a rejection letter from the very nice editor who said that my submission was “too romantic”. Man, I wish i had saved that rejection letter.

An Iranian documentary filmmaker told me she wanted to invite me to Iran to do a documentary, featuring me tasting Persian food (traditional and contemporary). I said okay, secure in the fact there was no way I would be issued a visa to go to Tehran. I like the idea of tasting Persian food…but geeze I no longer like the discomfort of long-distance travel. Also the distance between an idea for a film and the production of an actual film is a long, long one…and often the original idea gets lost along the way.

So things are turning over here in Verona.

Ugo arranges for winery visits in the morning (with the festival taking place in the late afternoon and evening.

We visited. Le Mandolare (www.cantinalemandolare.com), owned by the Rodighiero family. A lovely visit, charming company. At the tasting the winery’s entry-level Soave wine, went down a treat: fresh, with a burst of apricot on the middle palate that carries on through the finish. It was just what was needed on a hot day.

I asked Chiara Rodighiero what she would have done had she not entered the family business. “Music,” she said. “I play the Sax and the French Horn. My husband went to the conservatory and studied French Horn.” She still plays in a band under the direction of Carlo Montanari.

COFFELE. (www.coffele.it) Wow! What a visit! The Coffele family pulled out all the stops, giving the San Gio crowd an exceptional experience. We visited their animals – donkeys, goats, chickens and a really fine work horse -, we lolled on the lovely lawn overlooking the most splendid view of Soave, and then they provided us with a bang-up lunch. (The chef was the winner of Hell’s Kitchen Italia). AND the wines were – of course- great as always. Among them there was the elegant, pear-tinged 2015 Soave Brut and the Ca Visco Soave, with its enticing undertow of ripe pears on the palate.

We also visited another producer, who has a very beautiful facility but has not yet come to grips with what it means to do a winery visit.

PRODUCER TIP: If it is a broiling hot summer day, with the sun directly over-head (as it is around High Noon), then it would probably be best to NOT deliver the lengthy opening remarks in a shade-less, chair-less portion of the terrace. In the same vein, it would NOT be wise to take a group of people who can still feel rivulets of sweat sliding down their spines into a chilled cellar room (ice cream would not have melted or even softened in this environment) to stand for over 30 minutes. In short: visitors are human beings and should be treated with the courtesy you would show to any mammal.

6 July Maddalena Crippa at the Teatro Romano

I like the trend of allowing women to play Shakespearean kings and princes.  A few years ago, the great British actress Fiona Shaw played the role of Richard II and of course last Glenda Jackson appeared as King Lear.

We arrive at the Teatro Romano, built in the late 1st century BC, to see Richard II, the title role performed by Maddelena Crippa.

For those that need reminding, here is a brief description of Richard II, from 1066 And All That: A Memorable History of England, comprising all the parts you can remember, including 103 Good Things, 5 Bad Kings and 2 Genuine Dates  (yes, I get most of my British history form this wee bookie.)

Richard II: An unbalanced King

Richard II was only a boy at his accession: one day, however, suspecting that he was now twenty-one, he asked his uncle and, on learning that he was, mounted the throne himself and tried first being a Good King and then being a Bad King, without enjoying either very much: then, being told that he was unbalanced, he got off the throne again in despair, exclaiming gloomily: “For God’s sake, let me sit on the ground and tell bad stories about cabbages and things.” Whereupon his cousin Lancaster (spelt Bolingbroke) quickly mounted the throne and said he was Henry IV Part I. Richard was thus abdicated d was led to the Tower and subsequently to Pontefract Castle where he died of mysterious circumstances, probably a surfeit of Pumfreys (spelt Pontefracts).

 

June 2017

June 2017

I have tried to correct the year to 2017 in every way I know how…to no avail. So I have given up. YES, it is supposed to read 2017.  Perhaps it will correct itself in time…who really knows?

First things first: Book Fairies and more Book Fairies 

The Book Fairies (http://www.thebookfairies.org) “collects reading materials for people in need throughout metropolitan New York. The reading materials foster literacy and academic success, provide a respite from personal struggles, and nurture a love of reading across age groups. Visit the site to find out how to become involved.

And internationally…

The Book Fairies (http://ibelieveinbookfairies.com/)

started in London with the Books on the Underground project, but has now spread to 26 countries. Anyone can become a Book Fairy. Take a look at the website.

20 June Lunch with Maz and Arne

I have known Maz for a very long time: she can cook, she can sew and she is the only person in Italy that I would trust in my home with a hand drill.  We brought a magnum of sparkling wine of 2010 Berlucchi Cellarius (Franciacorta, bright, lively, mature pleasure. www.berlucchi.it/i-franciacorta/cellarius/) Maz and Arne opened a bottle of a Swiss Chardonnay made by Donatsch (a touch of wood, nice.  www.donatsch.info/chardonnay-passion.)

24 June Dinner at Daniels

We brought a 2002 Giulio Ferrari, disgourged in 2014. Bright gold. Firm persistent bubbles enliven the palate. “There is still enough acidity there – it’s still nervy on the palate. We’re tasting a Grand Old Dame,” said Daniel.  Daniel opened a 2015 Soave from Pra called Otto. (a fine amalgam of soft ripe pear and a pleasing frisson of acidity. www.vinipra.it/it/vinipra) The name is not derived from the number eight, rather it is the name of Graziano Pra’s dog.

Wine Tasting memories

In the 1980s wine tasting in New York was a competitive sport (and it probably still is). There always had to be winners and losers. I remember being invited to a young wine salesman’s apartment for a Burgundy tasting. He threw open the door instantly at my knock. A manic brightness gleamed in his eyes.  Superciliousness burst from every pore. He pulled me into the room, thrust a glass of red wine in to my hand and exclaimed: “Identify this wine!” I glanced at the dozen or so people, each turned toward us, waiting for the show to begin, and silently I thanked Daddy for all those games of poker we played in my childhood. For I knew in an instant that whatever was in that glass, it would surely not be Burgundy. Only the day before I had read about French producers who had invested in the United States. I knew the answer to his question before the scent of the wine reached my nostrils. I casually waved the glass under my nose handed it back to him and said, “Oregon Pinot Noir.”  He gaped, stepped back and frowned. One of the spectators, a brash young man given to wearing yellow ties, stepped forward and said, “Who’s the producer?”  I promptly supplied the name. A frisson of pleasure rippled down my spine as I watched him crumble. Game, set and match to me.

How did I know the name of the producer?  Elementary, my dear reader. From the proprietorial way in which he asked the question I deduced that it was probably he who had brought the wine to the tasting. I knew who he worked for and I knew what Burgundies his company represented. I recognized, from the article I had just read, that one of those companies had had successful results from their plantings in Oregon. Did I gushingly confess this line of reasoning to the assembled company? Of course not. As Sherlock Holmes says. “Results without causes are much more impressive.”

At other times winning the New York tasting game seemed to be determined by the volume of a player’s voice and by the length of time he could monopolize the conversation. The occasion of a tasting allowed a player to recite every great vintage he had ever sipped and the name of every Important Person he had ever met. The name of practically anyone English rated almost as high as Nobility. There also seemed to be points for getting as many of these names as possible into each minute of play. I found these lengthy digressions as interesting as listening to a baseball fan recite the RBI stats of every World Series since the year dot. George shared my opinion on this.

One evening we dined with two rich wine collectors. The starters came and our hosts launched into a detailed list of their Great Wines Past. The main courses arrived and they continued their recitation without a pause. We ate, they talked at us. Over the remains of our steaks and the drone of our hosts, George leaned over to me and said quietly: “You, know, Patricia, I have always wondered why you and I never became lovers.”

“Because you have a girlfriend,” I replied.

“Couldn’t I have two?”

“Not with me.”  Silence suddenly drenched our table. The rich collectors had, at last, lost their ability to speak.

 

May 2017

First things first: Books With Strong Girl Protagonists! 1 images tammyTamora Pierce is the winner of the 2013 Margaret A. Edwards Award for Lifetime Achievement in Young Adult Literature, the RT Book Reviews Career Achievement Award, and the 2005 Skylark Edward E. Smith Memorial Award for Imaginative Fiction. She is a New York Times and Wall Street Journal bestselling author of more than 28 fantasy novels for teenagers, and has been Guest of Honor at numerous conventions, including Worldcon 2016. She has written comic books, radio plays, articles, and short stories, and currently devotes her minimal free time to local feline rescue. TORTALL: A SPY’S GUIDE, a collaborative effort with other experts on her Tortall universe, will be out in October of 2017, followed in Spring 2018 by the first in a three-book Tortall series, TEMPESTS AND SLAUGHTER. Tammy lives in central New York with her husband Tim Liebe and their uncountable number of cats, two parakeets, and the various freeloading wildlife that reside in their back yard. You may find her at www.tamorapierce.com, on Facebook, and on Twitter. I first met Tammy in the very late 80s when we were living in New York City. Back then she had written a martial arts script and got some NYU film students on board to film it. I “acted” in it – I had a death scene… unfortunately I had a hard time remaining immobile. We even did some clandestine shooting in Central Park, as I recall. I often wonder what ever happened to that film. It would be nice to see us so young and deliciously exuberant. At any rate, I am extremely happy that Tammy has succeeded in bringing strong and daring girls and young women to the forefront in her fiction.

 

May 27 – A Trip down Memory Lane 2 IMG_1173We go to the Osteria Carroarmato for dinner. A few months ago, I took 5 cases of wines from older vintages there. I figured that if they stayed in our wine closet they would never be drunk. At the Carroarmat we could open them and share them – which is exactly what happened. Annalisa (the owner of the Carroarmato) and I trooped down to the cellar and pawed through the cases and chose a 1988 Amarone and a 2009 passito.

 

 

 

 

4WINE LESSON: When tasting older vintages, you look to see how the wine has evolved over time. You revel in the evocative tertiary aromas and enjoy the kind of pleasure it still gives. Example: Paul Newman in his 70s. Yes, he is old…but the corn-flower blue eyes still sparkle and his bone structure is firm. He isn’t the same as he was when he pouted his way through Cool Hand Luke, but he still attractive and vivid. So, a wine that can age well is – in my mind – a Paul Newman wine.

 

1988 Amarone from Masi: A dark, rich tariness over a raisiny fruit. A vaporous scent of grapiness rises from the glass. It still gives pleasure. After 20 minutes, it opens up. The nose has an enticing floral note. I think it is safe to say that they don’t make wines like this anymore. 2009 Fiordilej Passito Villabella. Pleasing. After 20 minutes a touch of honey emerges and is bouyed by mandarin-tinged acidity. Unofficial note: pretty yummy. Annalisa offered a 1988 Cesare Passito from La Salette that was still vibrant and fresh.

 

May 19 Soave – Come Rain or Come Shine We took the bus to Soave for a tasting, a couple of vineyard visits and to hear some speakers who – for the most part – were indeed interesting. Wines that made the trip worthwhile:

Gini 2013 Soave Classico Salvarenza – a citrusy sherbet-y note. I would be happy to wear this scent…so fresh and uplifting.

Soave Classico ”Monte Carbonare” 2012 Creamy texture, an elegant grown-up vivacity. I love this wine.

Domaine Sigalas Assirtiko “Santorini” 2016 Fresh, Vibrant. Citrusy. http://www.sigalas-wine.com/english/ Assirtiko is a white grape variety that is indigenous to the Greek island of Santorini. To protect the grapes from the driving wind and fierce sun the vines are trained to form a basket. .

 

8For Importers (and wine fans) looking for something new from Soave: Franchetto http://www.cantinafranchetto.com/ The Franchetto family turns out elegant, satisfying wines. Of particular note: Franchetto Soave La Capelina 2015: Bright, sprightly. Elegant nose. Lightly thyme infused flavor over subtle white fruits (peach and pear) La Capelina 2016 – barely ripe peach sorbet – I want to eat it with a spoon. When we arrived, we learned that La Capelina had won the Decanter award as “The Best White Wine of the Veneto”. So there! If you need more assurance that the company makes good wines let me say this: Of the seven wine journalists present at the winery visit and tasting, three of them bought 3 to 6 bottles of the company’s wines to cart home. Everyone in the wine trade knows that wine journalists only buy wine if the wine in question is indeed special and the price is low with respect to the wine’s value.

 

17 and 18 May Verona Wine Top 9Was a judge once again at the Verona Wine Top tasting. The wines are tasted blind, That means that we tasters do not know that names of the producers. However, we do know the type of wine, such as Soave, Custoza, Valpolicella, Amarone, etc. There were around 8 judges on each of the three panels. My impressions: Of the wines my panel tasted I found the whites to be of a very high standard, with my highest scores going to Custozas.

 

 

WINE LESSON: What is Custoza? Custoza is made from a blend of indigenous varieties – Garganega, Trebbianello (a biotype of Tocai Friulano) and Bianca Fernanda (a local clone of Cortese. Where is the Custoza production area? Near Lake Garda. The reds were more problematic. The Ripassos were often unbalanced and many of the older Amarones had not aged well – they were hollow on the middle palate and there was not one whiff of what they might have been in their youth.

 

12-17 May Reading Jenny DSCN0726Our friend Jennifer arrived. The first thing she said was: “I need something to read”. I handed her Brilliant by Marne Davis Kellogg. A fine piece of escapist reading, tightly woven plot, witty narrative, great fun. When Jen finished it, she said: “Wow! What an ending. I didn’t see that coming.” Jen was an ideal house guest – she spent most of her time reading and drinking win on the balcony. We sang show tunes at the top of our voices and if she wanted to see sites she was content to amble out on her own…a pleasure to have her visit.

February 2017

1. Evelyn Marsh_dark green_Cover_FinalBooks: A message from Scott Clemens, author of Evelyn Marsh.  (A book I thoroughly enjoyed reading.) “The Kindle version of Evelyn Marsh is scheduled for publication on March 14th. It’s currently available for pre-order at: http://amzn.to/2kGjWve  The more reviews before publication, the better Amazon’s algorithms will push it. So I’d really appreciate it if you’d go to the pre-order page, scroll down to the Customer Review section, and leave a review. It doesn’t have to be long. Even a few lines would help.”

 

 

Feb 23 Amarone tasting at Villa de Winckels

Susan H. picked us up and off we go…

2 amaroneI adore the annual Amarone tasting at Villa de Winckels (www.villadewinckels.it) because it includes everyone: from International stars and local heros to the man pictured, Giovanni Ruffo. He makes very nice wines. His annual production is: 650 bottles of Amarone and around 3,000 of Valpolicella, all of which he sells at three local restaurants.

Other producers who stood out for me include (in the order they appeared on the tasting list): Brigaldara, Roccolo Grassi, Santa Sofia, Speri, Tenuta Sant’Antonio, Venturini Massimo, Vigneti di Ettore, Zanoni Pietro and Zyme.

I did not taste every wine at the event because there were more than 60 wines and because Amarones have an alcohol level that ranges between 15 to 17+.  I seldom taste more than 25 Amarones at a standup/strolling event. Some of my favorite producers were busy when I passed by and, with good intentions, I vowed to go back and taste their wines later. But anyone who has been at a large tasting knows that the chances of returning are slim.

Tasting Tip: At professional sit-down tasting of wines with alcohol levels that hover between 12 and 14, a taster can do 30 to 40 wines in a morning session and repeat this number in the afternoon. I don’t mind that kind of tasting but I no longer enjoy being frog-marched off to a Big Dinner at the end of one. I much prefer to go home, take a hot bath and have a nice bowl of cottage cheese (to calm down the acidity that builds up after a string of sprightly whites or sparkling wines). Tasting requires metal acuity: you cannot do it well when you are tired.

Feb 19 Lunch at th Carro Armato

3 Luca, in the midst of a busy lunchtimeWe lunched with our friends Lorenzo Z, Meri F. and their daughter Vita and Dog Maggie.  Stanley and Maggie were well behaved. They each chose their spot under the table and waited patiently for any bit of food that might happen to be offered.  Vita, who is 2, had learned the word “NO!” and treated us to its many shades of meaning. Also at lunch was Meri’s pal Marta Carnicero from Spain.

For aspiring novelists, I will tell her story. Marta was taking a creative writing cours, focusing on novels. At the end of the course, she turned in her book to her professor who, upon reading it said: “This is really good, you should look for an agent.”  A short time later a translating student at Columbia University in New York wrote to Marta asking if she could translate excerpts from the novel for her course because she had to work from original, unpublished material. Marta happily supplied a PDF. The translation professor read the excerpts and said: “This is really good. Would Marta mind if I showed this to a couple of publishers?”. Marta certainly did not object. And now two New York publishers are eagerly awaiting the full translation of her book (which is written in Catalan).  “I never wrote it thinking of publication”, said Marta. “I just wanted to fulfil the assignment.”  I asked her why she wrote it in Catalan rather than in Spanish.  “My mother spoke Catalan and it is the language I use to speak with her and with my sister. I felt I could more fully express emotions and intimate ideas in that language.”

When her book is published, I will let you know. New authors should be nurtured and promoted.

Feb 14. Valentine’s day whoopee.

4We (or do I mean I?) had a glass or two of Ca’ Del Bosco’s Cuvee Prestige Franciacorta Brut. Lovely saturated yellow, broad and appealing on the palate. Satisfying.

We then headed out to Danial B.’s birthday party.  Daniel is the brother I wished I had. He is smart and kind and undeniably odd – a fine description of many of my best friends.

 

 

Feb 11/12 50 shades of gray in Valpolicella

5 sabrinaSoccer fans from Udine came to Verona for the weekend. Our Chievo soccer fan club (“Chievo is Life”) organized events for them. We road on their great big bus, while Massimiliano Fornasar, President of his local Chievo Soccer fan club (and jim-dandy wine producer, www.fornaser.com) gave a little tour of the area. Massimiliano, microphone in hand, would say things like:” On your right you could see the Somethingorother winery – if it weren’t so foggy. To your left is an ancient church – you can almost see it.” Of course, the fog was so thick that you could see nothing out the windows. This did not stop the co-mingling fans from having a swell time.  We then went to Massimo’s osteria (Osteria Alla Pieve in San Pietro in Cariano) for chow. I spoke with the head of the Udine supporters fan club about perfume (he sells is) and to another Udine fan about the value of “love letters” – written on paper and spritzed with perfume. I had a wonderful time. No one asked me about sports, my interest for which is extremely low.  We tasted some of excellent Fornasar’s wines. Of particular note is the Il Genio, a warming, fruity, pleasing Valpolicella. Unfortunately the fine label you see here is only used locally. For foreign markets, there is the serious label. Pity. I could just see this wine being served at author’s signing parties.

The next day we had a big fan lunch at the Chievo is Life fan club headquarters before the Udine/Chievo match. There were many more attendees than anticipated because Giorgio, our leader, believes in being all inclusive – Everybody is welcome at a Chieve Is Life” event.  So many people came that another table had to be found to accommodate the throng. Here is a photo of Sabrina, a serious Chievo support, who volunteers to help prepare and serve the food at these events. It was she who marshalled the extra table and took command of the situation. When all was rolling along smoothly I went to her and told her I admired her organizational skill and her ability to come up with solutions at the drop of a hat. “There are some thing you just have to do for love (of the game) and friendship,” she said.  Here is a photo of Sabrina.

 

January 2017

1 -pilgrimsoftombelaine_coverFirst things first: Books.  Glenn Shea’s new book of poetry – The Pilgrims of Tombelaine – has just been published by Salmon Poetry. Glenn, whose poems have been read by Garrison Keillor on Keillor’s radio program, and who has collected fans in many countries (no least of which Italy) writes with elegance and wit. If you realize the value of poetry, buy this book at www.salmonpoetry.com. It should be up on Amazon shortly.  (Pardon the cover cropping; I am inept when it comes to manipulating images.)

 

 

January 29  The Annual Amarone Anteprima Tasting

This tasting is the high point for Veronese wine lovers as it offers a superb opportunity to taste the recent vintage of Amarone and talk directly with the winemakers and owners of the estate. There were many wines that I appreciated. However, my policy is to only write about wine that ring my chimes.

English Lesson: “To ring one’s chimes (or bell)” means to give a particular frisson of pleasure.  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WLtw3yzq2HE

Here is a link to DJ Jazzy Jeff & The Fresh Prince (a.k.a Will Smith) Ring My Bell, which gives a more explicit illustration the phrase.

My three favorite wines:

Serious Francesca Sartori
Serious Francesca Sartori

Roccolo Grassi 2013 (it will be released onto the market in a year) A bruised plum color. Fresh, yet with an appealing complexity of ripe fruit. (ripe cherries notes weave in and out of dark berry fruit flavors. (blueberry, brambles) (www.roccolograssi.it)

Viviani 2011 Bright. Almost green note on the nose – a weave of flavor that shifts and changes, leading to a clean flavorful finish. ( www.cantinaviviani.com )

Zyme 2009 a sleek cylinder of fruit, impeccable balance, a close weave of flavor (ripe cherries, blue berries) and spice (mace), superb texture that caresses the palate  (www.zyme.it)

A young-ish winemaker said to me: “Your book on Amarone is an icon. Just yesterday I was with a bunch of producers and they were passing around your book saying: ‘Look at those picture; look at how young we were.’ I like it because you really understand farmers.”   What a nice thing to say.

January 24 Dinner at Porto Alegre 

beer, a lottery and cake!
beer, a lottery and cake!

This restaurant is owned by Sergio Pellissier, the captain of the Chievo Soccer Club. It was a fan dinner.

 

 

 

 

 

January 21 Dinner at the Gepsters

We had dinner at a friend’s house. The usual line up was there. The food was mostly vegetarian. The magnum of Villa 2010 Franciacorta Extra Dry we brought was lovely, satisfying, easy to drink (and I mean that in the nicest way). It was a great way to start the evening. After the snacks, the pasta starters, the main course, the salads, the cheese, the fruit and the nuts, conversation heated up. A rhetorical question about the US directed vaguely at me became a typical lecture about America’s current situation. On and on went the scree, the substance of which seemed to have been trawled from conspiracy theory websites.

3 - piratePontificating is a major sport among three of the 4 Italian men at the table. (and then there is sociable, sensible Michael, the only non-Italian man present. Being the right sort of Englishman he would never blather on like a batty old duffer.) I did what I have always done in these circumstances: I started doing word games in my head. I came up with 30 anagrams using the letters for Claudio – my favorite being lucid. And still the spew of looniness continued. So, I came up with around 30 words from Patricia – my favorite was tiara. I told Michael what I was doing and he came up with piratic – having to do with pirates. Do you understand more fully why I adore my husband? Piratic!!!

 

January 10 Custoza and Chablis, BFFs (that’s Best Friends Forever, for those who don’t use acronyms)

3During  last year’s Vinitaly wine fair, members of the Custoza Wine Consortium (www.vinocustoza.it) had a chat with Raoul Salama, Director of La revue du vin de France (www.larvf.com). From this historic meeting has come a synergistic collaboration between the wine producing zones of Custoza and that of Chablis.

What do these areas have in common? Salama explained: Both are cool climate zones, and the precipitation is practically the same, as are the altitudes of the vineyards.

What sets them apart? Primarily grape varieties. Chablis is 100% Chardonnay, while Custoza is made from a blend of indigenous varieties – Garganega, Trebbianello (a biotype of Tocai Friulano) and Bianca Fernanda (a local clone of Cortese).

So, today we find ourselves at the Hotel Milano for a tasting of Chablis and Custozas.  The brief it not to compare the wines. It was not a matter of finding one wine better than the other, rather it created an excellent environment in which to really think about the identifiers for Custoza. For me those identifiers are an idea of candied fruit and a particular texture (that I think of as tweed) on the palate. Among the producers who made a good impression on the tasters present: Cavalchina (www.cavalchina.it), Albino Piona (www.albinopiona.it which presented a wine from the 1999 vintage that was still crisp and appealing), and Monte del Fra ( www.montedelfra.it ).

The Chablis were provided by La Chablisienne (www.chablisienne.com), whose director, Damien Leclerc, was also on hand.

At one point 4 of the 12 wines were presented blind (with the identity unknown to the tasters). Our little task was to tell the Chablis from the Custoza.  I had no problem with this – not necessarily due to my consummate skills as a taster. No, it had to do with memory.  The instant I put my nose in a glass of Chablis I spontaneously and instinctively smiled because the fragrance took me back to the years I worked with French wines in London. One of the Chablis presented stood out because at first sniff I was taken back to my days as a sommelier at snooty New York restaurants. That wine was: Chablis Chateau Grenouilles 2012. Lovely.

Cousin It on a good hair day
Cousin It on a good hair day

We then trooped over to Perbellini’s (www.casaperbellini.com ) in Piazza San Zeno for dinner. The food was imaginatively presented and the service was top notch. I will describe my favorite dish, a dessert:

A small cup (the size of a spool of thread) made of white chocolate. It is filled with pineapple juice and a straw has been inserted into the chocolate.  This is covered with lime-infused spun sugar.  It looked like (The Adams Family’s) Cousin It on a bad hair day and was absolutely delicious and great fun to eat.

Giancarlo Perbellini, the chef, also created a dish designed to go with Custoza, which he will insert into his regular menu: Zuppa Custoza, made with Broccoletto di Custoza, a local leafy green.

In an area that has more than its fair share of well-known wines – Soave, Valpolicella, Amarone, Bardolino – sometimes other local wines with long histories and great potential – like Custoza – are overlooked. It is the Consortium’s plan is to shed a little light on Custoza by concentrating on making it better known at Verona’s restaurants and bars. So, the next time you stop by Verona – to enjoy the opera, to gape at the Roman arena, or soak up some culture – take a moment to try a glass of Custoza.  You might find a new favorite.
8 January Nabucco Yum

My favorite wines this year are turning out to be: juicy, fruity wines that have a well-defined personality, and that can go with a wide variety of food.

5 -Monte delle Vigne’s 2012 Nabucco (a Barbera and Merlot blend). (www.montedellevigne.it )Yes, it is juicy, fruity (raspberry, brambles) and sprightly, with a pleasing spicy element. I served this red with Hokkien Fried Noodles (a dish well suited to a fresh yet elegant and well-balanced red wine, one that is not so rich as to overwhelm the nuances of the seafood. The recipe came from the book I wrote with Edwin Soon – Matching Wine with Asian Food. The next day I had a glass with a fried chicken and cheese sandwich. It was great with both. Michael opined that it would go really well with barbeque ribs. However, by the time he made that suggestion the bottle was almost empty.

The last glass of Nabucco went down a treat with an episode of Masterchef Australia. I love Masterchef Australia because no contestant has ever said: I am not here to make friends, I am here to win. Instead they say things like: I’m, so happy for Kylie, she deserves to win.

Oh, how I admire good sportsmanship.  It is a quality that seems to be dying out.

January 3 A day without books

When I have a day without something to read I do foolish things like clean the closet, wash the floors, etc.  During today’s brief cleaning adventure, I asked Michael to go through his shoes and select the pairs he would never wear again so that we could put them out on the dumpster for the people who come to trawl there in the evening. Here is why I adore my husband: before putting the shoes out, he polished and buffed them.  It is the small, thoughtful actions that make a difference in this world.