April 2018

April 2018

Wednesday  Fish and Chef (www.fishandchef.it )

We go to the Regio Patio restaurant in Garda to enjoy a lunch in the Fish and Chef annual pairing of Italy’s top chefs and local wineries – served at snazzy restaurants located on Lake Garda. The chef this afternoon is Terry Giavotella of Ristorante “Inkiostro” in Parma. The accompanying wines are from Costaripa – Mattia Vezzola, starting with a lovely onionskin-colored – and much appreciated – Brut Rosé.

“At Vinitaly this year I decided to write about winemakers I have known for over 25 years,” I told Mattia. “I looked for you but couldn’t find you. I remember the first time we met.”

I had called Bellavista, where Mattia was head winemaker, to set up a visit for an article I was writing. Because I do not drive, it was agreed that he would meet me in a large parking lot in Verona and take me to the Franciacorta estate. When I asked how I would recognize him, he said: “I’ll be the tallest person in the lot.” And he was.

“I left Bellavista 8 or 9 years ago to return to Costaripa, the winery founded by my grandfather in Moniga del Garda,” he said. (www.costaripa.it/en/)

The wines we tasted at lunch were crisp and satisfying, with an undertow of salinity.

“Now that we have found each other again, you must come out to the estate. I can pick you up from the train station,” he said.  And we will.

My 28th Vinitaly, the world’s largest annual trade fair:

Table of Contents

A Word About Influencers, Our First Wine of the Fair, Three Trips down Memory Lane – Bucci, Braida, Fattoria Zerbina and Vignalta, and Other Wines  

First, a word about “Influencers”. I was introduced to two nice young men who proudly told me they had been chosen by Vinitaly International as Important Influencers, and that they wanted to be the most trusted source for information about Italian wine.

Still naïve after all these years, I said: “If you want the names of producers of really fine wine, I would be happy to supply them.”

This remark was met with silence and a shifting of position. A darting look passed between them.

I said: “You mean that you only write or broadcast about people who pay you?

Again, that darting look and a brief uncomfortable silence.

I said: “Look, I understand marketing and if you are promoting your clients there is nothing wrong with taking money for the job.”

At that point they relaxed and said: “Yes, our time is worth something. We have to give away a certain amount of free help now, but the idea is that the producers pay.”

I said. “So, the first one’s free, kid.”  (This phrase is a reference to what drug dealers say to young potential clients in hopes that the first hit will keep them coming back for more.)

And then I thought:  How can you be the most trusted source for information when people are paying? …when the characteristic that is most important is the Money that they give you?

Allow me to revert to my codgerette status. Back in my day, if an actual wine writer accepted money from a producer in exchange for an article he/she would have been fired from any reputable publication.

And yes, I know that magazines accepted advertising. However, paid publicity was clearly identified as such. No one expected unbiased information from an ad.

English Lesson:  Codger means a cranky old man.  Codgerette is a term Michael and I use to indicate a cranky old woman.

My rant over…back to the FAIR…

Our first stop is at the stand of Friulian producer Di Lenardo and our first wine there is Toh!, which is made from the Friulano grape, formerly known as Italian Tocai,. The wine has a rich sensation on the nose, with an amalgam of scents –  pear/elderflower/blossoms. A lovely silky weight in the mouth. And what a great quality/price ratio!

Massimo Di Lenardo and his wife Paola Podrecca, owners of the estate, are mega dog-lovers.

“We tried again this year to convince the Vinitaly management to let us bring Oscar – in a Vinitaly T-Shirt – to stay on the stand but they said no. He would have been much more effective that those girls,” Paola said, referring to the 18 to 20-year-old women dressed in Lycra and Drag Queen shoes, whom some producers hire to take up space in front of their stands. Paola has a point. Happy, tail-thumping Oscar would be much more welcoming than the palpably bored young women. Not to mention the fact that well-behaved, warm-eyed Oscar would be a social media hit.

Four Trips Down Memory Lane

Bucci www.villabucci.com

In the early 1990s Decanter asked me to write an article on the Marche that would include a report on Verdicchio.  Like the good swat I was, I did my research before setting off. This was in the days before Google started dispensing anonymously sourced information. Instead I actually read Italian magazines and – most importantly – I asked trusted wine-savvy friends for personal recommendations. The name Bucci was mentioned multiple times.

I arrived at the Consortium in the Marche for the Big Tasting. A long table sat in the middle of the large room, the wines set up along one side.  The producers stood along the wall. Their expressions ranged from an awkward glumness to an eager puppy-in-the-pet-shop-window hopefulness.  I walked along the line of bottles and noticed there was no Bucci.  Naïve as I was, I went to the director of the Consortium and asked why Bucci wines were not there. An uncomfortable silence followed.

You see, back then, I thought that Consortiums represented the wine zone, not just the paid-up members. When the director started to “erm” and “ah, well…”, I said: “I’ve got the winery phone number. Will you call them for me?” I had backed the poor man into a corner. He finally crumpled and rang the winery. The samples appeared, and my tasting began. The Bucci wines were excellent, and I have continued to enjoy them over the years, and always look forward to tasting them.

Braida www.braida.com/it

My first taste of lardo was from the fingertips of Giacomo Bologna…at Vinitaly. He was a charismatic figure, who put Barbera on the map for lovers of fine wine. He died in 1990 but his children have inherited his go-power, particularly his daughter Raffaella, who has her own dynamic energy and quick wit. Michael (my husband) imported Braida wines into London when I met him 31 years ago. I liked the wines then, I like them now.

We stopped by their Stand at Vinitaly to taste and reminisce.

“Remember when you were judges at the Rocchetta Tanaro cake contest. You and your friend Fred Plotkin. I bought his book on opera,” said Raffaella.  We then spent a few minutes gushing about how much we love Fred. (He is a charming and erudite fellow, who is an expert on opera, but also has written some great books on Italian food.)

“I remember the year we pissed off Raffaella’s cousin, the baker, when our carrot cake was ranked higher than his cake,” said Michael.

What I remember best about our many cake contest visits was the singer who was doing his best to get through Sinatra’s ode to New York.  He crooned: “My little town shoe…..is wanting to do…..”

But now to the wines. Bricco dell’Uccellone (100% Barbera) has been a favorite wine of mine from the very first time I tasted it. My notes on the wine always include the words “plummy”, “creamy”, “richly textured” and “long, evolving finish”. We tasted the 2016 vintage, which did not let me down.

Fattoria Zerbina www.zerbina.com

In the early 1990s I lobbied Decanter to let me do an article on Emilia Romagna so that I could write about Cristina Geminiani of Fattoria Zerbina. Michael had imported her wines into the U.K. since the late 1980s. She literally brought Albana Passito to the attention of fine wine lovers with her stunning Scacco Matto. (Checkmate), and her Romagna Sangioveses have always been at the very top of my list of great red wines. (And, it should be noted, My List includes 1961 Chateau Lâfite.)

When we arrived at her stand, the first thing Cristina said was: “I’ve got a new puppy!”  Yes, there is often dog talk when I run into people.

I inhaled the evocative perfume of her 2011 Marziano. Thought about it, reveled in it, was carried away by the poetry of it.

I looked at Cristina and asked: “When they finally drag me off to the old folks’ home, will you send me a bottle of this wine every month to give me something to live for?

“It might not be the same vintage,” she said.

I love tasting Zerbina wines because when I do so, it is like diving into the wine’s complex universe of flavors and fragrances, an experience that sparks the imagination and makes tasting more exciting and more interesting.

Also, let it be said that I really do love great Romagna Sangiovese wines. They give sensual pleasure when young and juicy and develop into a swirling nebula of rich, fascinating, ever-evolving flavors and scents as they mature.

Vignalta www.vignalta.it/en/

We visited this estate in the Colli Euganei on my birthday 26 years ago, and spent the day with Lucio Gomiero and his business partner at the time, Franco Zanovello. (Readers of this diary are familiar with the name Franco Z. www.calustra.it), I was enchanted by the beauty of the Colli Euganei and by the wines of Vignalta.

I tried to convince Decanter to do an article on the winery but was told that they only wanted to do profiles on wines that were available in the London market, which is fair enough. But I could not get the wines out of my mind. I realized that although I could not highlight Vignalta, I could do an article on the Veneto (loads of names that were already known in the U.K.) and then slip in a little box that would include the names of a couple of good producers who were not yet in the market. I did this, then contacted Vignalta and asked them to get in touch the moment their wines were available in London…and they did. I have tasted the wines every one of the intervening 26 years and they consistently give pleasure.

“Try this. It is the only wine in our list you have never had before because it is brand new,” said Lucio, holding out a bottle of 2015 Nostrum, a 50/50 blend of Cabernet Franc and Carmenere.

WINE LESSON: In the 18th century Carmenere was widely planted in the Medoc, where it helped add color and body to the zone’s wines. The variety was first planted in Italy in the Colli Euganei. After phylloxera (a vine louse that devastated the vineyards of Europe) swept through Bordeaux, Carmenere lost ground to less vulnerable varieties.

“There is virtually no Carmenere left in France,” said Lucio. “At Vignalta we started planting it ten years ago.”

Nostrum is deep ruby. On the nose it is fresh and plummy. Round on the palate, with a texture like raw silk. The flavor is an amalgam of cherries, mulberries and blackcurrants, with an earthy undertow. A touch of gentle astringency. A long fruit-filled finish.

Vignalta is another winery whose wines continue to give pleasure. Three words to describe the house-style: rich, complex, textured.

Other Wines I liked at the fair

Musella’s 2016 Valpolicella Superiore Nice, bright cherry red, with fuchsia highlights. Warming, with a buoyant acidity.

Ronc Sorelli’s 2013 Schioppettino A wonderful nose – ripe, enveloping. The palate follows the nose: freshness infuses the flavor, lifting and enhancing the experience of tasting. Dark ruby, scents of dried flowers. Richly textured, with an amalgam of fruit flavors that include blackberries, raspberries and blackcurrants.

Donnafugata 2017 Grillo. Bright, forward, joyous bursts of acidity and fruit flavors (peach among them). Once again I find that this wine expresses the concept of Spring.

2 April – Big Chievo fan club annual picnic

October 2017

 

First things first: Books

I have shelves of autographed mysteries from my days at The Mysterious Bookshop in New York, as well as a nice letter and autographed copy of Robert Mazzocco’s first poetry book.

I had written him a letter after reading one of his poems in the New Yorker.  The poem is called All Night.  I mentioned in my letter that the layout of the lines echoed the rhythm of the text. He wrote back saying that the poem would never again appear in that form because the editor of his first book tucked the lines in order to accommodate the book’s format, and he invited me to come to a signing. I arrived to find his signing table surrounded by poetry lovers. I caught his eyes and mouthed the words: “I wrote the letter.”  He stopped what he was doing, walked around the table,  took my hands in his and said: “You’re the one! No one ever sends fan letters to poets!”

One of my happiest author memories.

28 October Marco Felluga’s 90th Birthday Party   

I arrive in Friuli for the celebration of Marco Felluga’s 90th Birthday.

I need not have worried about my dress (bought in 2000) and Chinese inspired jacket (bought in 2003 at a model’s consignment shop in London.  This is a shop where fashion models – who get to keep the clothes they wear in photo shoots – dump their booty.   The only thing in the shop that fit were shoes and this jacket.) In fact, I received several compliments on the ensemble.

With the repeated mention of “black tie” on the invitation and in phone conversations with the organizers, I had begun to dwell on what “black tie” means for women at Tuscan galas – brilliant hand-embroidered satin dresses, the twinkle of real diamonds, etc. Whew. Friuli finery is within the reach of normal human beings.

I sat next to Mr. Felluga’s Austrian importer who said that Marco was still mentally and physically agile and as focused and dynamic as ever.

Mr. Felluga was asked what his plans for the future were and he replied without a moments hesitation that he wanted to inicreased the acceptance of Pinot Bianco as a top-quality, classic grape variety.

With his energy and drive I believe that he could achieve anything he put his mind to.

20 October Pumpkin and sausage lasagna & Susan and gossip

Susan H. comes over for dinner.  The nattering goes down smoothly with glasses of Ferrari’s Giulio Ferrari 2000, followed by a 2013 Ribera del Duero “Crianza” from Virtus.  I had opened this Spanish wine the day before and tasted it: rich, round, red – juicy but with backbone.  A very satisfying wine. It goes down a treat with the lasagna.  Here is a photo of Susan with a snuggling Stanley. For starters we taste Redoro’s artichokes under oil and the company’s tuna under oil.  They are a revelation.  I have never in my life tasted anything held under olive oil that did not taste of…well…oil. However, this time out the flavors of the vegetable and the tuna were bright and pure.  I did not expect this freshness. I am not usually one to gush, but…if you have a chance to try these products from Redoro, do so.

18 October Fog Hell

I am in the Colli Euganei. Lisa C. drives me to the teeny, tiny deserted-after-nine-p.m. train station so I can catch my train for Verona. In the car creeping along the country road, we are surrounded by a moist gray undulating wall of fog.  At first, I think: gee, this I like being in some existentialist film.  After 30 minutes, I realized that this is, in fact, my version of Hell – endless fog – no sense of actually moving forward – no hope of actually arriving anywhere.

 

14 October – Off to Redoro in Mezzane di Sotto

We visited the Redoro Olive Oil Mill (owned by the Salvagno family) in Mezzane di Sotto. The mill is the oldest in the Veneto that is still producing oil. I said to Michael: “Daniele Salvagno has such merry eyes he could play young Santa when they do the biopic.” “He’s not that young,” says Michael. I then explain to him that since Santa is well over a thousand years old, then Daniele – with his twinkling eyes, rosy cheeks, lush dark curls, boundless energy and jovial demeanor – is still in the running for the role. Michael bows to my fantasy logic. Here is a photo of Daniele.  You may decide for yourself if the casting works.

12 October Samples arrive from SPAIN!

The UPS man delivered samples and pronounced my name correctly!

They are from the Virtus winery.  I tried the Vega del Yuso Ribera del Duoro. Here is my note: 100% Tempranillo. Deep rich ruby. Full and forthcoming on the nose, scents of blackberries, brambles and a bright, lifting idea of gooseberries. Round and easy on the palate.  After I tasted, I drank a glass with my lunch – pizza with mushrooms.  It went down a treat.  The following day, I had a glass with spaghetti Bolognese.  It also went well with a bit of Parmesan and an episode of Love it or List It – Vancouver edition.  Yes, I am a sucker for Canadian buy-a-house-shows.

Sunday 8 Majorotti

We went to a street fair organized by the Majorotti (loosely translates as Big Men Majorettes), an association that raises money for charity, and whose members wear shiny, red, swishy skirts and wigs in an assortment of colors – from Carnival yellow and blue to (could pass for real) brown. There is something freeding and empowering about stridinig out in a short, flippy skirt, as these men have come to appreciate.

October 2 My book on the Colli Euganei wins a literary award!

And a very nice award it was too: a silver medallion, with a little certificate stating its weight and the grade of silver used.  Wow!  All this, and there was a concert performed by three excellent guitarists that followed the presentation.  And that was followed by a dinner in a villa/restaurant, where I spoke with a nice young man who is studying to be a forest ranger. I recommended he read The Hidden Life of Trees. You will never look at a tree in the same way after reading this fascinating book. The award was issued by the Monselice Historical Museum.

I have won big deal international awards for books and only got a letter informing me that I had won, while the publisher got a certificate. Believe me, a medal, music and a nice dinner (which included my fan club – Michael, Franco and Anna) was soooo much more appreciated!

 

September 2016

24 September Art in a Fragrant Garden

The annual Canova prize for young sculptors, sponsored by the Canova Foundation and the Guerrieri Rizzardi wine company, is a magnificent opportunity for young artists. The prize consists in part of a showing of the winner’s work at the Museo e Gipsoteca Antonio Canova in Possagno. This year was a joint show of the works of Maria Savoldi and Giulia Berra.

 

2Savoldi’s work is site specific, which means the sculpture is created in and for a particular place. Arranged around the large room in the exhibition hall were photographs of her sculptures – all of which are made of colored wire. These images are the result of a bicycle trip she made through France, Spain and Portugal.  “I would find a place that inspired me but at the same time seemed to lack something. Then I would fill the void,” says Savoldi.  “When I was working, people would gather around and watch. There were lots of children who would come up and ask me what I was doing and we would talk. I was never alone on this trip.  I left the pieces in situ for people to touch or take away.” She also attached tags on the work with her email address should someone wish to contact her and discuss the work.

Her act of creation can be seen as a work of art in itself.  I hope that many other opportunities come her way to travel and share her experiences and artistic vision.

Giulia Berra produced vessels (made of bent wood and feathers) which were suspended from the ceiling in a smaller room. The interaction and movement of the shadows they cast created the interesting sensation of walking inside a work of art.  Again, there was a transitory nature to the work.

After the show, all the guests trouped out to the beautiful garden and forked down nice plates of spaghetti and drank excellent Guerrieri Rizzardi wine.

Michael and I got home, loaded up Stanley and headed down to the train station on our way to Vicenza, where we had dinner with Susan H. – all the vegetables were from her garden and we washed things down with Champagne.  Yes, it was a good as it sounds.

 

17 September Meeting Myra And tasting a Valpolicella from another space and time

4-myraMyra lives in the Collie Euganei. I wrote a book about this incredible place (The Venetian Hills: A Connoisseur’s Companion to the Colli Euganei). She saw the book and wrote an email suggesting we meet.

Myra brings her book, a memoir of her life in a Colli Euganei spa town: The Best Mud in Italy.

 

 

 

4aTocati, the annual festival of street games is in full swing in the centro storico. The games are those that involve sticks, balls, rocks and chalk. Yes, real old fashioned games! One of the founders of this event was Gianni Burato, a wonderful illustrator and very kind and intelligent man. His friends still miss him. The logo you see was drawn by Gianni. He also did the cover for my book Bacchus at Baker Street – the version with the cover featuring a Basil Rathbone-ish gent sipping Champagne.

 

 

5-wine We go to the Osteria Carroarmato for lunch and ask Annalisa, the owner, to choose a wine for us. The 2010 Taso Valplicella Classico Superiore from Villa Bellini is superb. Brilliant rich cherry color with a dark sheen. It is vibrant on the nose and palate, with firm seductive flavors of mature cherry. Supple yet vivacious – a 3 dimensional sensation. The wine just keeps on giving pleasure. After 40 minutes in the glass it is still firm and flavorful.  I have no idea why this photo has come out sideways….if you are looking for techical perfection I fear you must look elsewhere.

“The first time I tasted this wine I thought of that 1988 Quintarelli Valpolicella you brought to dinner a few years ago. It had that same staying power,” says Annalisa.  “This is probably the last chance to taste this wine or a wine of this style from Villa Bellini because the owner has sold the estate to a big company.”

She said this because, as every wine lover knows, Great Wines are made by individuals with vision and a soul.  This certainly does not mean that Villa Bellini will necessarily be making lesser wines.  But they will be making different wines, ones that reflect the current winemaker/owners. I wish them well.

13 September Dancing in the Office

It is 10 a.m. I slip Xavier Cugat: King of Cuban Rhythm! into the cd player and Michael and I rumble a rumba. Ahi ahi ahi!  I will confess: I dance and sing every day.  I don’t do either of these activities exceptionally well…but boy do I have fun. This is the first time I have enticed Michael into a morning dance.

4 September  Lunch with Gian Paolo and family at the Carroarmato.

Oh, I have known Gian Paolo for 20 years! We met at the first ever International Wine fair to be held in Brazil. The fair itself, held in a big hotel complex, was nice enough. The tranquility of the event was marred only by the periodic shattering of glass shelving. The organizers had not realized that heavy glass bottles are best displayed on something a bit tougher – if less elegant – than plate glass. And the urge to put one more bottle on a thin sheet of glass was just too tempting for some.

One of the positive results of the trip was that Gian Paolo became a good friend and was, in fact, the Italian Best Man at my wedding.  He also gave Michael one of his first freelance translating jobs. The relationships you forge during difficult times are usually meant to last.

 

8However, the most delicious outcome of this trip as far as I am concerned is that Ed, our dog, got his first byline in Decanter, a well-known British wine magazine. I had already contracted to write about the fair for another magazine when I got the call from Decanter. My byline could not appear over both stories, so the editor and I agreed to assign the second one to Edmund Cane (a.k.a. Ed Dog), my alter ego. From there Ed’s career blossomed until he had contributed to every major British wine publication. Each time his byline appeared I would whisk his copy of the magazine down to Annalisa at the Carro Armato and she would give him a meatball for being such a clever dog.  Ed was less than 200 grams when we got him and the doctor estimated that he was around 3 weeks old.  He had been abandoned.  He was the smartest dog I have ever had the pleasure to know.

 

3 Tasting and smoozing at Soave VS9Here is a photo of Charlie Atuola with Stanley.  Charlie is the international wine consultant behind the Duel of Wine film, which will be presented (out of completion – way out of competition) at the Venice film festival. He is sublimely happy.

There is an Italian expression: non c’e un cane (there’s not even a dog), which is used to indicate that few people turned up at an event. That can certainly not be said of Soave Versus. The place was packed. Yes, I tried to edit the image but to no avail.

2 September Dinner in the Grand Guardia to kick off Soave VS.

We arrive and mill around a bit.  The mayor of Verona comes in and recognizes Michael – Michael usually participates in the San Gio Video Festival Press Conference which takes place in July – and comes up to shake Michael’s hand.  I can see Aldo’s eyes light up. Being on cordial- greeting-terms with local politicians is a much prized attribute in Italy.

I was fortunate to sit next to a person who enjoyed talking about books. Everyone at the table gave me their leftover meat to take home to Stanley.  What a great group.  Doing something as brutta figura (in this case we can translate the expression as gauche) as taking home leftovers to the dog is frowned upon in Italy. But the Soave-ites know me by now and indulge my little foibles.

1 September Press Conference for Soave VS

We roll up to the town hall to attend the Press Conference.  I bring a paperback (PerryMason e la Voce Fantasma a.k.a. The Case of the Mythical Monkeys).  Soave Versus is the annual 3-day event (with tasting) that is now held in the Grand Guardia in Piazza Bra. After the Press Conference Aldo (the director of the Soave Consortium) suggests we follow him and a couple of bloggers and a politician of some sort (I try not to remember the names and positions of local politicians – no matter how nice they may be personally). We go to Signore Vino and chow down on sliced meats and SOAVE!

May 2016

1First things first: Books.  A few months ago Publishers Weekly sent me a collection of short stories featuring detectives Bryant and May by Christopher Fowler to review.  I laughed out loud as I read. I vowed I would find as many of the novels featuring Bryant and May as possible. Once again the fabulous Glenn at the Book Barn in Connecticut came through, finding me 4 books.  I, of course, read them one after the other. Witty dialogue, fascinating peeks at London history and characters who are fun to know.  Who could ask for more?  I am very glad that there are 10 more Bryant and May novels out there waiting for me.

 

 

May 9 Terra di Pietra

2We go out to Torbe, a hilltop village in Valpolicella to taste the wines of Terra di Pietra and visit their new vineyard. The tasting and dinner were held at Trattoria Caprini. (www.trattoriacaprini.it).

One of my favorite wines from the tasting: 2013 Le Peste (vinified in cement) Soft ruby. Fresh, pure nose. On the palate: red berry fruits, black cherries and a delicate floral note (hybicus). Silky texture.

“I wanted to make a good superior without wood and using natural yeasts,” says Laura Albertini, co-owner of the winery.  She succeeded.

After the tasting, they served the best pasta I have every had (10 eggs for every kilo of flour and the pasta is rolled out by hand using mega-long rolling pins.)  I was so impressed I asked one of the owners (it has been family-owned for generations) for a business card.

He said : “We don’t have business cards anymore because with technology nobody needs them…BUT we have bookmarks instead.  They are always useful.”  On one side there is the address etc of the place and on the other there is a poem by a dialect poet.

Do I need to tell you the surge of love I felt for that man and the restaurant at that moment?  “Bookmarks are always useful!”   If you know any small business owners suggest they do this; they will certainly garner the loyalty of the Real Book Reading cult.

May 11  Dining with the Players!

Albano Bizzarri (goal keeper) surrounded by fans.
Albano Bizzarri (goal keeper) surrounded by fans.

I went to a Chievo Calcio (Soccer) Dinner. There were 130 fans, 3 Chievo players and a couple of people from Chievo’s management.

When the players arrived there was as much applause and I thought: If Cumberbatch walked into a BSI (Baker Street Irregular) or ASH (Adventuresses of Sherlock Holmes) event there would be the same goofy pleasure on the faces of those present, the same level of applause, the same amount of surreptitious (and blatant) selfies, the same amount of polite and respectful requests for autographs. Hummmm fans.  There has been a Big Dispute for the past few years among some factions of the U.S. Sherlockian world about using the term “fans” to describe, well, those with a more literary turn of mind.  I believe that the English Sherlockians (called Holmsians) don’t really care about that kind of nomenclature and just get on with enjoying the camaraderie. But perhaps they have their own tiffs about this matter.

NOTE for Italians: Tiff.  This is a lovely word that means a little quarrel.

May 19 Getting the boot(s) in Soave

 

567The three highpoints of this visit to Soave in the rain.  (in order of occurrence) 1. The rubber boots laid on for the visitors at Coffele Winery (www.coffele.it )    2. Ciara Coffele’s beagle puppy and 3. The superb 2005 Soave Salvarenza from Gini – lively, evolving flavors. (www.ginivini.com)  I took my glass of the wine from the tasting to the dinner.  I sniffed it every 5 minutes.  After 40 minutes it was still firm, fresh and fragrant.  I could have continued my experiment in longevity but I couldn’t hold out any longer and drank the wine for the pure pleasure of doing so.

Note for Italian readers: The expression “to get the boot” means to be kicked out.

21 and 22 in The Colli Euganei

8I went to the Colli Euganei to present my book about the zone to groups of journalists at various points throughout the 2-day event. I arrived hoping that I would only have to speak in English (hooray the Germans, Scandinavians, Poles and Japanese – not to mention the English, Australians and Americans – usually speak decent English.) And in fact – thank goodness – the Italian travel writers also understood English. When I addressed this latter group I had made myself so nervous that I just threw in the towel and did my little song and dance (a.k.a. presentation) in an insane mix of the two languages.

I become irrationally nervous when I must address a group of Italian who are strangers to me.  In my head there are always two monologues going on: 1. What I have to say and 2. The voice that is noting, with mounting hysteria, every error – after it has emerged from my mouth.

9 - Colli Euganei e nuvoleI can do interviews on wine and books in Italian. (Usually it is just me and the interviewee so a kind of comfortable intimacy evolves.) I can easily do simultaneous translations of the things said to me in Italian – BUT standing in front of people who would rather be eating their lunch/dinner completely unnerves me.

NOTE on English/American expression for Italian readers:

To throw in the towel means to give up in order to avoid further punishment when facing certain defeat. The expression derives from boxing: when a boxer is being beaten up and has no chance of winning, his manager literally throws his towel into the ring as an indication to stop the fight.

NOTE for those who do not know what the Colli Euganei are:

10-VignetiThey are the most unusual collection of hills you will find on this planet. Over the centuries those inspired by them – poets, artists, and geologists – have most often describe them as looking like islands emerging from a wave-less sea.  The hills were formed (between 34 and 33 million years ago) by a series of seismic shifts of rock substrata. In some cases, these shifts allowed molten lava and gases from deep within the earth to surge upwards, pressing against but not quite breaking through the ocean floor. As a result of erosion of this type of formation some of the hills have an odd, soft rounded shaped, like a soap bubble emerging from a bubble pipe. Others are the conical form we typically associate with volcanoes, although they are not actually volcanoes, as an eruption never took place. Most of the hills have a volcanic core. They are simply amazing to see.  This area – it should be noted – was fundamental in the development of Venice as we know it. Venice is paved with stone from Colli Euganei quarries, wood from the Colli Euganei forests was used to build the Venetian armada and produce and grains from the Colli Euganei zone were carried by boats along canals to Venice in order to feed hungry Venetians.  In the summer – to escape the heat of the city – Venetians built superb summer homes here (complete with stunning gardens).  All this plus thermal spas that were famous since Roman times and some excellent wines as well.  Really, who could ask for more?

Highlights of the visit:

111 Seeing old pals

2 Floating in the thermal pool at the Abano Ritz (www.abanoritz.it ) I would take up residence in this hotel if I could.

3 Doing a Sudoku while sitting on a bench in front of Villa Beatrice d’Este on Mont Gemola. The breeze was fragrant with scents of new mown grass, pine sap and meadow blossoms, and the only sound was bird song and the soft rustling of leaves.

  1. An olive oil tasting conducted by Devis from the Cornoleda Olive Mill. He has great energy and knowledge. (www.frantoiodicornoleda.com )
  2. A ride on a canal boat.
  3. Dinner at “Relais La Montecchia”, a restaurant run by the exceptionally talented and imaginative members of the Alajmo family.
  4. Listening to hypnotic, ancient Chinese music at the Museo Nazionale Atestino in Este.
  5. Tasting the wines of Ca’Lustra (www.calustra.it ) outside, in good company and with – as always – a stunning view. My favorite wine of those I tasted today was the 2007 Sassonero (100% Merlot) Long finish, backbone and brambly fruit, with an undertow of dark tones that are reminiscent of tar.

1227 May The Goose Man

I prepare a stuffed goose neck made by www.michelelittame.it.  The Goose Man gave a little talk and a taste while I was in the Colli Euganeis. My favorite quote: “We decided to raise geese because goose was the only meat not found in the supermarket.”  Very tasty, too.

These wonderful photos of the Colli Euganei were taken by Elena Bianco.

FEBRUARY 2015

27 February Hoopla in Venice
1A photo of me with Franco Zanovello (who makes wonderful wine) in Venice at the Grancaffé Quadri (www.alajmo.it) for the presentation of the book, The Venetian Hills: A Connoisseurs Companion to the Colli Euganei. St. Mark’s Square was filled with sunshine. The ornate room was filled with friends (some of them brand new), the snacks were superb (the best tartar I have ever eaten), the wine was provided by my favorite producers.

Thank you to everyone…particularly to the members of The Strada del Vino of the Colli Euganei who sponsored the book and who offered insightful suggestions. Thanks also to Giulia Reato of Terra Ferma, who is an attentive and creative editor in both Italian and English. And, of course, a great big thank you to Franco who was instrumental in keeping the book alive.

4GIorgios Copertina_Colli_EuganeiI was fortunate2 enough to have pals at the event who took some super photos. The one of the bottles was taken by Annamaria Farina. The others were snapped by Susan Hedblad and Louise Lewis.

 

22/23 February Sangiovese di Romagna
It is time for my annual love-letter to Sangiovese di Romagna:

I have been following the development of this wine for over two decades, and every year the number of producers who make high quality examples grows larger. And every year, my pleasure in tasting this versatile wine increases.

Sangiovese is the most widely-planted grape variety in Italy and is perhaps best known as a major component (or, in some cases, the only variety used) in a long list of famous wines, most notably Chianti and the Tuscan classics such as Brunello di Montalcino and Vino Nobile di Montepulciano. Like Pinot Noir it is a site-sensitive grape and for this reason the wines of Romagna stand out for me.

Along with the cherry-near-the pit fruit flavor and silky texture that distinguishes the variety, Sangioveses from Romagna have an appealing roundness and softnenss on the palate that makes them very versatile when it comes to matching them with food. Often, when I am tasting wines, food partners for them seem to blossom in my imagination. And with Sangiovese di Romagna I often think of (and indeed eventually serve it with) vegetarian dishes – from bean burritos to nut and lentil casseroles – as well as the more traditional partners such as pasta with meat sauce, or roast and grilled meats. Its broad, soft berry fruit balanced by sprightly acidity also make it a fine match for Chinese Imperial-Style Grilled Spareribs or Kashmir Rogan Josh. And the very qualities that make this wine good with vegetarian cuisine makes it one of the few reds that can be successfully matched with Satay.

My favorite producers remain Fattoria Zerbina and Drei Dona.
At the big tasting I asked one of my favorite sommeliers to suggest a producer or two. She named two producers whose wines I liked: Cantina Braschi (“Montesasso” – clean and juicy) and Francesconi (“Le Iadi” – nice, also organic).

.

 

9 february TheVerona Sherlock Holmes Tour (sort of )
7Peggy Perdue getting the park bench tour of Verona. We saw all the important Sherlockian landmarks: the Filippini for aperitifs and the Osteria Carroarmato for lunch (with our dog Stanley).

Then we took in a photographic exhibit of pictures by Tina Modotti, silent film actress and pal of the Riveras in Mexico. Pablo Neruda composed her epitaph. I wish the exhibit information-signs had been a little more forthcoming with the juicy details of her life…but I suppose they did not want to overshadow her work.