April 2018

April 2018

Wednesday  Fish and Chef (www.fishandchef.it )

We go to the Regio Patio restaurant in Garda to enjoy a lunch in the Fish and Chef annual pairing of Italy’s top chefs and local wineries – served at snazzy restaurants located on Lake Garda. The chef this afternoon is Terry Giavotella of Ristorante “Inkiostro” in Parma. The accompanying wines are from Costaripa – Mattia Vezzola, starting with a lovely onionskin-colored – and much appreciated – Brut Rosé.

“At Vinitaly this year I decided to write about winemakers I have known for over 25 years,” I told Mattia. “I looked for you but couldn’t find you. I remember the first time we met.”

I had called Bellavista, where Mattia was head winemaker, to set up a visit for an article I was writing. Because I do not drive, it was agreed that he would meet me in a large parking lot in Verona and take me to the Franciacorta estate. When I asked how I would recognize him, he said: “I’ll be the tallest person in the lot.” And he was.

“I left Bellavista 8 or 9 years ago to return to Costaripa, the winery founded by my grandfather in Moniga del Garda,” he said. (www.costaripa.it/en/)

The wines we tasted at lunch were crisp and satisfying, with an undertow of salinity.

“Now that we have found each other again, you must come out to the estate. I can pick you up from the train station,” he said.  And we will.

My 28th Vinitaly, the world’s largest annual trade fair:

Table of Contents

A Word About Influencers, Our First Wine of the Fair, Three Trips down Memory Lane – Bucci, Braida, Fattoria Zerbina and Vignalta, and Other Wines  

First, a word about “Influencers”. I was introduced to two nice young men who proudly told me they had been chosen by Vinitaly International as Important Influencers, and that they wanted to be the most trusted source for information about Italian wine.

Still naïve after all these years, I said: “If you want the names of producers of really fine wine, I would be happy to supply them.”

This remark was met with silence and a shifting of position. A darting look passed between them.

I said: “You mean that you only write or broadcast about people who pay you?

Again, that darting look and a brief uncomfortable silence.

I said: “Look, I understand marketing and if you are promoting your clients there is nothing wrong with taking money for the job.”

At that point they relaxed and said: “Yes, our time is worth something. We have to give away a certain amount of free help now, but the idea is that the producers pay.”

I said. “So, the first one’s free, kid.”  (This phrase is a reference to what drug dealers say to young potential clients in hopes that the first hit will keep them coming back for more.)

And then I thought:  How can you be the most trusted source for information when people are paying? …when the characteristic that is most important is the Money that they give you?

Allow me to revert to my codgerette status. Back in my day, if an actual wine writer accepted money from a producer in exchange for an article he/she would have been fired from any reputable publication.

And yes, I know that magazines accepted advertising. However, paid publicity was clearly identified as such. No one expected unbiased information from an ad.

English Lesson:  Codger means a cranky old man.  Codgerette is a term Michael and I use to indicate a cranky old woman.

My rant over…back to the FAIR…

Our first stop is at the stand of Friulian producer Di Lenardo and our first wine there is Toh!, which is made from the Friulano grape, formerly known as Italian Tocai,. The wine has a rich sensation on the nose, with an amalgam of scents –  pear/elderflower/blossoms. A lovely silky weight in the mouth. And what a great quality/price ratio!

Massimo Di Lenardo and his wife Paola Podrecca, owners of the estate, are mega dog-lovers.

“We tried again this year to convince the Vinitaly management to let us bring Oscar – in a Vinitaly T-Shirt – to stay on the stand but they said no. He would have been much more effective that those girls,” Paola said, referring to the 18 to 20-year-old women dressed in Lycra and Drag Queen shoes, whom some producers hire to take up space in front of their stands. Paola has a point. Happy, tail-thumping Oscar would be much more welcoming than the palpably bored young women. Not to mention the fact that well-behaved, warm-eyed Oscar would be a social media hit.

Four Trips Down Memory Lane

Bucci www.villabucci.com

In the early 1990s Decanter asked me to write an article on the Marche that would include a report on Verdicchio.  Like the good swat I was, I did my research before setting off. This was in the days before Google started dispensing anonymously sourced information. Instead I actually read Italian magazines and – most importantly – I asked trusted wine-savvy friends for personal recommendations. The name Bucci was mentioned multiple times.

I arrived at the Consortium in the Marche for the Big Tasting. A long table sat in the middle of the large room, the wines set up along one side.  The producers stood along the wall. Their expressions ranged from an awkward glumness to an eager puppy-in-the-pet-shop-window hopefulness.  I walked along the line of bottles and noticed there was no Bucci.  Naïve as I was, I went to the director of the Consortium and asked why Bucci wines were not there. An uncomfortable silence followed.

You see, back then, I thought that Consortiums represented the wine zone, not just the paid-up members. When the director started to “erm” and “ah, well…”, I said: “I’ve got the winery phone number. Will you call them for me?” I had backed the poor man into a corner. He finally crumpled and rang the winery. The samples appeared, and my tasting began. The Bucci wines were excellent, and I have continued to enjoy them over the years, and always look forward to tasting them.

Braida www.braida.com/it

My first taste of lardo was from the fingertips of Giacomo Bologna…at Vinitaly. He was a charismatic figure, who put Barbera on the map for lovers of fine wine. He died in 1990 but his children have inherited his go-power, particularly his daughter Raffaella, who has her own dynamic energy and quick wit. Michael (my husband) imported Braida wines into London when I met him 31 years ago. I liked the wines then, I like them now.

We stopped by their Stand at Vinitaly to taste and reminisce.

“Remember when you were judges at the Rocchetta Tanaro cake contest. You and your friend Fred Plotkin. I bought his book on opera,” said Raffaella.  We then spent a few minutes gushing about how much we love Fred. (He is a charming and erudite fellow, who is an expert on opera, but also has written some great books on Italian food.)

“I remember the year we pissed off Raffaella’s cousin, the baker, when our carrot cake was ranked higher than his cake,” said Michael.

What I remember best about our many cake contest visits was the singer who was doing his best to get through Sinatra’s ode to New York.  He crooned: “My little town shoe…..is wanting to do…..”

But now to the wines. Bricco dell’Uccellone (100% Barbera) has been a favorite wine of mine from the very first time I tasted it. My notes on the wine always include the words “plummy”, “creamy”, “richly textured” and “long, evolving finish”. We tasted the 2016 vintage, which did not let me down.

Fattoria Zerbina www.zerbina.com

In the early 1990s I lobbied Decanter to let me do an article on Emilia Romagna so that I could write about Cristina Geminiani of Fattoria Zerbina. Michael had imported her wines into the U.K. since the late 1980s. She literally brought Albana Passito to the attention of fine wine lovers with her stunning Scacco Matto. (Checkmate), and her Romagna Sangioveses have always been at the very top of my list of great red wines. (And, it should be noted, My List includes 1961 Chateau Lâfite.)

When we arrived at her stand, the first thing Cristina said was: “I’ve got a new puppy!”  Yes, there is often dog talk when I run into people.

I inhaled the evocative perfume of her 2011 Marziano. Thought about it, reveled in it, was carried away by the poetry of it.

I looked at Cristina and asked: “When they finally drag me off to the old folks’ home, will you send me a bottle of this wine every month to give me something to live for?

“It might not be the same vintage,” she said.

I love tasting Zerbina wines because when I do so, it is like diving into the wine’s complex universe of flavors and fragrances, an experience that sparks the imagination and makes tasting more exciting and more interesting.

Also, let it be said that I really do love great Romagna Sangiovese wines. They give sensual pleasure when young and juicy and develop into a swirling nebula of rich, fascinating, ever-evolving flavors and scents as they mature.

Vignalta www.vignalta.it/en/

We visited this estate in the Colli Euganei on my birthday 26 years ago, and spent the day with Lucio Gomiero and his business partner at the time, Franco Zanovello. (Readers of this diary are familiar with the name Franco Z. www.calustra.it), I was enchanted by the beauty of the Colli Euganei and by the wines of Vignalta.

I tried to convince Decanter to do an article on the winery but was told that they only wanted to do profiles on wines that were available in the London market, which is fair enough. But I could not get the wines out of my mind. I realized that although I could not highlight Vignalta, I could do an article on the Veneto (loads of names that were already known in the U.K.) and then slip in a little box that would include the names of a couple of good producers who were not yet in the market. I did this, then contacted Vignalta and asked them to get in touch the moment their wines were available in London…and they did. I have tasted the wines every one of the intervening 26 years and they consistently give pleasure.

“Try this. It is the only wine in our list you have never had before because it is brand new,” said Lucio, holding out a bottle of 2015 Nostrum, a 50/50 blend of Cabernet Franc and Carmenere.

WINE LESSON: In the 18th century Carmenere was widely planted in the Medoc, where it helped add color and body to the zone’s wines. The variety was first planted in Italy in the Colli Euganei. After phylloxera (a vine louse that devastated the vineyards of Europe) swept through Bordeaux, Carmenere lost ground to less vulnerable varieties.

“There is virtually no Carmenere left in France,” said Lucio. “At Vignalta we started planting it ten years ago.”

Nostrum is deep ruby. On the nose it is fresh and plummy. Round on the palate, with a texture like raw silk. The flavor is an amalgam of cherries, mulberries and blackcurrants, with an earthy undertow. A touch of gentle astringency. A long fruit-filled finish.

Vignalta is another winery whose wines continue to give pleasure. Three words to describe the house-style: rich, complex, textured.

Other Wines I liked at the fair

Musella’s 2016 Valpolicella Superiore Nice, bright cherry red, with fuchsia highlights. Warming, with a buoyant acidity.

Ronc Sorelli’s 2013 Schioppettino A wonderful nose – ripe, enveloping. The palate follows the nose: freshness infuses the flavor, lifting and enhancing the experience of tasting. Dark ruby, scents of dried flowers. Richly textured, with an amalgam of fruit flavors that include blackberries, raspberries and blackcurrants.

Donnafugata 2017 Grillo. Bright, forward, joyous bursts of acidity and fruit flavors (peach among them). Once again I find that this wine expresses the concept of Spring.

2 April – Big Chievo fan club annual picnic

APRIL 2016

First things first: Books

1-aprilThe very nice editor at Publishers Weekly came to the Adventuresses of Sherlock Holmes Spring lunch in New York and he brought me a book to read: Adam’s Rib by Antonio Manzini (Original Italian title: La Costola di Adamo). It is set in Aosta.  Yes, Aosta. The main character Rocco Schiavone is complex and intriguing and I will happily follow him into future adventures.

 

My pal Glenn from The Book Barn in Connecticut rounded up some books I wanted, and pals Kate and Ed brought them to New York for me.  These included several of the later Tony Hillermans.  I had asked Glenn to find the books Tony had written after I left New York in 1987.

 

When I returned to Verona I had the need to go and live in those books for a while. I read The First Eagle, The Thief of Time, Sacred Clowns and Talking God.  I really do love these books. Joe Leaphorn and Jim Chee are people I like to be with.  I like to be in the beautiful and strange landscapes that Tony describes so eloquently.   I have a few more, but I will save those for another time when I am feeling nostalgic for Big Sky country.

 

People who have never lived on the Great Plains or in the desert really cannot understand the way such landscapes make a person feel.  I’ll try to explain: you feel small and by feeling small you allow yourself to become part of a greater whole.  Also what at first seems austere and arid is, on closer examination, juicily alive with beauty.  In the plains and desert you have to really look and by looking you see worlds within worlds.  Well, it seems I cannot express this concept as well as I’d like.  All I can suggest is this: go to the desert in springtime when tiny red and yellow flowers sprout on the upturned arms of giant cacti OR stand in the middle of a vast wheat field that stretches right up to the flat horizon line above which is an equally vast blue, cloudless sky. Then think about how you feel.

 

April 22 THANK YOU, SUSAN

Susan H. takes Michael and me to dinner at the Vescovo Moro. The food was good, the wine flowed freely and the talk touched on some shared favorite things: old roses with heady scents, Indian and Asian spices, friendship, etc.  A lovely evening.

 

April 10 to 13 VINITALY

Cristina from Zerbina
Cristina from Zerbina

Yes, the world’s largest annual trade fair took place once again.  I will spare you a long series of tasting notes.  Instead I will just list the wines that Rang My Chimes.  Suffice it to say, I recommend all these wines and the producers who made them.  If you see the producer’s name on a wine list, buy the wine. You will not be disappointed.

There were of course many great wines at the fair that I did not taste for lack of time.

 

WINES THAT RING MY CHIMES

Fattoria Zerbina Sangiovese di Romagna “Pietramora” I tasted a flight of older vintages: 1990, 1997, 2004, 2007.  Generally speaking, the wines were round, between velvet and silk, with an amalgam of fruit so firmly mixed that red berry and cherry fruits merge into one flavor.

Fattoria Zerbina  Albana Passito “Scaccomatto” – a flight of older vintages: 1990, 1992,1996, 1997, 2001. General style: All the components mesh seamlessly – honey, flowers and a squeeze of lemon.

Podera Sant Cristofo  Petite Verdot  2013 – Full, rich, fruity, appealing

Villa Bucci Verdicchio 2013 – Full perfume, a fine weave of elegant apricot and elderflower and bright salinity.

Raffaella Bologna kissing my husband
Raffaella Bologna kissing my husband

G.D. Vajra – Barolo “Liugi Baudana” 2012. – Luscious, heady, satisfying. I could go on and on.

Braida Barbera d’Asti “Bricco della Bigotta” 2014 – Just as luscious as ever.

Braida Bricco del Ucellone 2014 – Creamy, rich and round – like chocolate covered cherries.

Marina Cvetic Trebbiano dìAbruzzo 2013 – Elegant balance between wood and fruit.

2-aprilI had a job to do during the fair: taste wines from South Africa for an Italian/English language website.  I am glad this assignment came up because it is unlikely I would have taken a morning to concentrate on South African wines under usual Vinitaly conditions. There were some nice bright whites and rich reds.  Producers I liked:  Diemersdal, Idiom, Morgenster and Ayam.

 

April 1 through 7 NEW YORK, NEW YORK

5-aaprilI am indescribably happy to be in New York. Many of my dearest friends live here and things have been organized so that The Adventuresses of Sherlock Holmes will have their Spring Meeting during my visit.  Hooray!

Things I did that gave me great pleasure (besides just seeing and talking to wonderful people whom I have known for decades):

I went to see the Broadway Musical Something Rotten.  Fabulous choreography, great dancing, an appreciative audience, two songs that stick with you – who could ask for more.

Here is a link to the opening number: Welcome to the Renaissance.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9fvmVhpc0fc

 

My pal Randall (friend since college) took me to The Modern, the Museum of Modern Art’s Michelin-starred restaurant. Extraordinary interior design, excellent food and the service was perfection. It was so perfect that it was almost creepy – it was like being served by the Stepford Wives. I got used to that pretty quickly.  Then we went to the Degas exhibit and selected paintings for our various imaginary country houses. Thank you, Randall.

 

6-april the hat sistersAfter the ASH lunch I went up to Guy and Julia’s (she is Kate’s sister). We convinced Julia to show us some of her collection of around 100 hats from the 20s, 30s, 40s and 50s.

 

 

Why I like the people of New York:

We went to the Transport Museum in Brooklyn.  My pal asked the security guard if the museum had wi-fi.

 

He replied: “Why? If we had wi-fi everyone would be looking at their phones and not reading the display signs and not learning anything about their city.”

 

We went to a Cuban restaurant.  I asked the waiter for a business card.  He returned with a baggie containing two cigars and three boxes of matches with the restaurant name and address.  (Havana at 94 Christopher Street havananyc.com).

 

Here is a quote from E.B. White’s Here is New York:

7-aprilOn any person who desires such queer prizes, New York will bestow the gift of loneliness and the gift of privacy.  It is this largess that accounts for the presence within the city’s walls of a considerable section of the population; for the residents of Manhattan are to a large extent strangers who have pulled up stakes somewhere and come to town, seeking sanctuary or fulfillment or some greater or lesser grail.  The capacity to make such dubious gifts is a mysterious quality of New York.  It can destroy an individual, or it can fulfill him, depending a good deal on luck.  No one should come to New York to live unless he is willing to be lucky.

 

MARCH 2015

1 with glenn shea I31 March BOOKS, GLORIOUS BOOKS
Kate and Ed come to Verona (from the USA) along with poet, pal and Book Barn (BookBarnNiantic.com) clerk, Glenn Shea, who brought me a satchel of 14 books. Among them was a copy of Dandelion Wine by Ray Bradbury. I love pre-owned books and this one had belonged to a soldier, who, when assigned to Viet Nam some 40 years ago, had had 400 books leather bound and shipped off with him. Holding this little volume, I felt a sweep of emotion. This soldier had loved Dandelion Wine as much as I did. It was as if – across space and time – we were sharing something profound. So thank you to Glenn for bringing it and thank you to Cleo C. Bresett Jr., the soldier who loved it and took care of it til the day he died.

 

We meet Ugo for a drink and I introduce Glenn as a poet. “You must read your poetry at my Thursday night poetry evening,” declares Ugo. So Glenn will perform his English-language poems to a group of Italian poetry lovers.

 

26 LUNCH WITH NEVILLE BLECH
Neville and I met while waiting for a bus that was to take us to a dinner in Valpolicella during the Vinitaly hoopla. We bonded big time in the 45 minutes we spent trailing after our keeper and decided to meet for lunch when the Big Fair was over. There is nothing like adversity to bring people together.

 

2. vinitaly22 March through 24 VINITALY RIDES AGAIN!
At Vinitaly, the world’s largest annual wine trade fair.

A New York PR guy sees me and says: It’s great to be here, isn’t it?

I reply: No. It is great to be in a place with a hammock and alot of sun. It is…okay to be…here.

 

 

Here are the producers I visited who made wines that rang my chimes – as we used to say.

 

For those unfamiliar with this expression: in this context, it means wines than not only give sensual pleasure but also give intellectual pleasure. In the best cases, it means: wines that life my spirits and make my heart sing.

 

Sparkling Wines:
Umberto Bortolotti’s (www.bortolotti.com) Valdobbiadene Prosecco Superiore Brut Rive di Col S. Martino “Castel de Donà” was one of the best sparkling wines I have ever tasted – and I love sparkling wines. It was like a classical-ballerina: powerful yet with lilghter-than-air grace. Absolutely exceptional. Full, fragrant, sorbet-like apricot fruit, with a sprightly infusion of steely minerality.

 

Maeli’s (www.maeliwine.it ) 2013 Fior d’Arancio – Moscato Giallo 100% fragrant, a burst of apricot sorbet on the middle palate. Then a minerally undertow. “It is like Dr. Jeckle and Mister Hyde,” says Elisa Dilavanzo, the manager of the estate. “It starts sweet but becomes dry.”

 

She recomends drinking it with raost rabbit with olives or eel mousse. Neither one of which is a mainstay on my table. I would like to try it with Nasi Goreng or other chill-hot Asian dishes.

KONICA MINOLTA DIGITAL CAMERAPasini San Giovanni 100% , mad from – yes – 100% Gropello. This is one of my favorite wines, year after year.

 

A different kettle of fish but none the less pleasing and satisfying is the Bardolino Chiaretto from Le Tende (www.letende.it ). I have followed this company’s wines for years and they always end up on my list of favorites when I taste Bardolinos.

 

 

White Wines:
KONICA MINOLTA DIGITAL CAMERAI made my annual pilgrimage to visit the Librandi (www.librandi.it) stand. Librandi makes superb wines from Calabrian indigenous varieties. One of my favorties is the Efeso Val di Neto Bianco IGT. It is made from 100% Mantonico. This vibrant, complex wine combines a steely note of minerality with a creamy sensation on the nose and palate. The flavor for me is an amalgam of delicate tones of nettle, elderflowers and toffee.

 

I stopped by the Di Lenardo stand (www.dilenardo.it) because everyone on the stand loves dogs and has a sense of humor! What a pleasure. I particularly liked their coppery Pinto Grigio – fresh, fruity and appealing.

Tramin (www.cantinatramin.it ) Nussbaumer 2013 Gewürztraminer is a Gewürztraminer for grownups. I also tried the 2007 vintage of this wine. Deep yellow, fresh, intriguing…it was a wine that took me to a higher level. Superb.

 

5Roncsoreli’s (www.roncsoreli.com) 2013 Friulano is one of the best I have ever tasted – good structure, an attractive salinity over apricot fruit. The palate follows the nose.

 

 

I asked Tania Princic, in charge of export sales for Roncsoreli, what she would serve with this wine. Her answer: Prosciutto San Daniele.

 

Let me go on record as saying I really like Friulano. I even liked it back in the days when it was called Tocai. My taste identifiers for Friulano: a slight saline note on the nose alongside scents of wildflowers, good structure and creamy texture. I often find ghosts of apricot and crème patisserie.

 

Red Wines:
Roncsoreli’s Scioppettino 2009 had all of the characterisitcs of classic Schioppettino: dark ruby color, full bodied, with a soft black pepper tone over richly textured fruit flavors, which include wild blackberries, raspberries and blackcurrants.

 

The Scioppettino grape variety appeared on the Friulian wine scene around 1300. It is primarily cultivated in the hills and foothills of the commune of Prepotto. In its early days, Schioppettino was more commonly known as Ribolla Nera.

 

In the years following the outbreak of phylloxera (a vine louse that infected many of the vineyards of Europe in the late 19th and early 20th century), Schioppettino lost ground to heartier-high-yielding varieties. The 1970s and 1980s saw renewed interest in Scioppettino, and in 1992, it joined the list of varietal wines made in the Colli Orientali del Friuli DOC zone.

 

The lesson is over, we can now return to the diary…

 

Cristina in her new specs
Cristina in her new specs

Fattoria Zerbina (www.zerbina.com) Il Marzeino 2009 (a blend of Sangiovese and Cabernet Sauvignon, with a bit of Merlot, syrah and ancelottaA velvety sensation on the nose. So fresh and youthful with a rich burst of rond cherry-like fruit on the middle palate. Fruity filled finish. A very atrractive wine.

 

Zerbina’s Torre di Ceparano Sangiovese di Romagna 2011. Elegant with a juicy soul. Lively on the palate. A long flavorful finish.

Ca Lustra’s (www.calustra.it) Moro Palo 2011 is a blend of Merlot and Carménère, with a bit of Cabernet. This is an exceptionally nice entry-level wine – satisfying and full on the palate.

 

Sabrina T.
Sabrina T.

Tedeschi’s (www.tedeschiwines.com) Capitel dei Nicolo Valpolicella 2013. Fragrant, almost perfumed. Very attractive.

“Some of the grapes undergo a light drying before pressing,” says Sabrina Tedeschi. “The Valpolicella zone is made up of many styles and price ranges. The zone is also comprised of many different types of soils and exposures – not all of which are capable of making Amarone,” Sabrina continues. “We are going against the trend a bit: while others are making more Amarone, we are increasing the production of our Valpolicella.”
Brava.

 

Another producer who is bucking the trend is Agostino Vicentini (www.vinivicentini.com/ he is perhaps best known for his superb Soaves). His Valpolicella Superiore Palazzo di Campiano 2011 is an excellent, satisfying wine.

 

“This is Valpolicella like it used to be – no semi-dried grapes,” says Agostino. “We use properly ripened grapes – not immature, not overripe. We can do this because there are only 4 bunches on each vine. It also helps that the vineyard is 450 meters above sea level.”

 

922 GRAVNER BOOK PRESENTATION – Michael did the English translation!

 

 

21 THAI SPAGHETTI WITH THE CHIEVO SUPPORTERS CLUB

 

KONICA MINOLTA DIGITAL CAMERA15 ONE BOOK FINISHED ANOTHER BEGUN

July 2013

July 30 Romagna on Parade

KONICA MINOLTA DIGITAL CAMERAIn keeping with my vow to taste at least 2 wines from Emilia Romagna every month until the samples in my foyer are depleted….

 

The “MorAle” Sangiovese Superiore 2011, produced by PODERI MORINI has the vibrant, fruity, cherry-near-the-pit flavor that I expect to find in a nice Sangiovese di Romanga.  It also shares the ability to pair well with vegetarian foods….bean burritos or an arugula and fresh, soft cheese pizza would be fabulous with this wine.   

 

A note about PODERI MORINI Morosé Brut sparkling wine can be found in the July 1 entry.  If you want to know more about Sangiovese di Romagna – the production area and grape variety, whiz down to the June diary.    

 

July 26 I Can Sing Again!!!

KONICA MINOLTA DIGITAL CAMERAThe world is brighter and lighter and infinitely more entertaining because of this.  I hadn’t realized that everything is a song cue for me until this recent problem with my voice.

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July 25 The Taming of the Shrew

3I went to the TEATRO ROMANO to see The Taming of the Shrew performed by the PROPELLER THEATRE COMPANY, an all male English troupe. 

The show was lively and funny…and then the last 15 minutes were potent, disturbing and yet exhilarating – simply sublime.

 

It concerns the scene where Kate admonishes the other wives to obey their husbands.  Dan Wheeler, the man playing Kate, was stunning. He didn’t play Kate as a woman submitting to her superior male…he played her like a person vanquished…a person whose inner structure had collapsed. Magnificent. 

 

Kate’s monologue ends with her on her knees, her hand held out for Petrucchio to step on should he choose.  There was silence on stage and silence in the audience for a good 30 seconds (an eternity in the theatre).  AND THEN Petrucchio got up and walked over to Kate.  He looked down at her. We saw different emotions playing across his face…including tenderness….AND THEN he stomps on her hand.  Another 30 seconds of silence on stage and in the audience. Then the other players leave the stage and the actor playing Petrucchio dons a coat and hat to indicate that he is no longer Petrucchio.  He says, stunned: “Where has everyone gone…where are the actors?”  And the actor playing Kate – still in Kate’s costume – comes on stage and snarls with barely supressed rage: “It only a play”.

 

Whew! The lights went down. The lights came up. The actors came out. And the audience went wild.  

 

If you have a chance to see The Propeller Theatre Company – do so!

July 23 – 27 The 19th annual San Gio Video Festival

Our pal Ugo created this event and continues to see it through despite a budget of practical nothing.  He also arranged for the jury to visit local wineries.  www.sangiofestival.it

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July 15 Ray Bradbury

To quote a favorite author Ray Bradbury: “You don’t have to burn books to destroy a culture. Just get people to stop reading them.”

July 7 Off to Chievo to eat watermelon and watch the players

I love the Chievo soccer club . not that I can be convinced to go to any of their games.  But I love them and their management.  Their fan events are so wonderfully old-fashioned: the players are polite and dogs and small children are happily welcomed.  I always feel like I have popped out of a time machine at these things.     

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.July 2 Off to the Oltrepo Pavese

Raise your hand if you know where that is.  Ah, right…well, perhaps I had better tell you. First of all, it is in the ron of Lombardy.  Lombardy’s major city is Milan.  And the gently hilly Oltrepo Pavese wine production zone is about 40 minutes by car from Milan.  It is about an hour and a half by car from Verona – if that car is driven by a fearless, text-messaging, tail-gating Italian.

KONICA MINOLTA DIGITAL CAMERAI am visiting Zonin’s IL BOSCO estate, which produces some very fine sparkling wines, to listen to wine consultant Nicolas Secondé.

He said: “For an enologist the Pinot Noir is the most difficult grape to work with. I’ve worked with it in Champagne, Alsace and Luxemburg. Pinot Noir is fantastique!”   

The two wines that stood out for me:

IL Bosco 2007 Oltrenero. Pale gold. Persistent small bubbles. Fresh, clean and inviting nose: frozen lemons. I close my eyes and see pastels – decisive pastels. On the palate: austere at first. A touch of hazelnuts and a whirl of sharp fruit on the finish.  I return to the wine after 20 minutes. It is firm and floral. Its fruit has settled down and broadened. After 35 minutes the frozen lemon and wild flower fragrances merge. Very nice.  After 40 minutes it softens and broadens and juicy white peach fruit emerges.  The finish is still fruit filled.  Very nice wine.

KONICA MINOLTA DIGITAL CAMERAIl Bosco Oltrenero Rosato   Pale pastel pink. Fresh, frozen strawberries, red currants. Bright and appealing. After 20 minutes white fruit flavors emerge – slightly under-ripe white peaches. After 25 minutes the wine is fruity and elegant on the nose, and the touch of salinity becomes more apparent.     

Both wines are based on Pinot Noir and both are made with the metodo classico. This is the Italian term for the Champagne Method, where the second fermentation – the one that creates the bubbles – takes place in the bottle, as opposed to taking place in large tanks.

July 1 Doctor’s orders          

KONICA MINOLTA DIGITAL CAMERAI put a bottle of sparkling Morosé from PODERI MORINI in the fridge before I leave for my appointment with my new medico di base. 

I ask him why I am still hoarse and croaky.  He LISTENED to me.  He READ all my documentation.  When he was done reading he looked up and said: “Wow, you’ve taken just about everything for this condition, haven’t you!”.  “Yep”.

Anyway, he gave me a prescription for some tablets and a syrup.  He says that within 5 days I should be much better and that I should continue the treatment for the rest of the month.  Hooray.  I really hate not being able to sing. I returned home with a song in my heart, if not on my lips, and opened the wine.

PODERI MORINI Morosé Brut sparkling wine.  A fine, pale cherry/blood orange rosé.  Clean, bright nose.  The idea of frozen strawberries on nose and palate.  Very clean on the finish, with a fine vibration of strawberry fruit.  A very nice summer tipple.  It is made from an indigenous variety called Centesimino grown in the Oriolo zone.